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July 15, 1635: William Pynchon Buys Land for Springfield

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Harvard Shakers Record Spiritual Visit: December 30, 1841
On this day in 1841, the Shakers in Harvard reported a spiritual visit by their long-dead founder Mother Ann, "Holy Angels," and "ancient...

Site for Cambridge Selected: December 28, 1630
On this day in 1630, the Massachusetts Bay Colony proprietors chose a site along the northern bank of the Charles River for their capital. They named...

Northfield Couple Launches U.S. Youth Hostel Movement: December 27, 1934
On this day in 1934, Isabel and Monroe Smith opened the first U.S. youth hostel in Northfield. The young couple had discovered hosteling during a trip...

The Great Republic Burns: December 26, 1853
On this day in 1853, the Great Republic burned to the waterline in New York harbor the day before she was to set sail on her maiden voyage. Built by Donald...

Alice Freeman and George Palmer Marry: December 23, 1887
On this day in 1887, Alice Freeman, charismatic president of Wellesley College, wed Harvard professor George Palmer, to the consternation of many Boston...

State House Celebrates “Return of the Colors”: December 22, 1865
On this day in 1865, Governor John Andrew officially received the battered regimental colors of Massachusetts units of the Union Army in a solemn State...

First Game of Basketball Played in Springfield: December 21, 1891
On this day in 1891, the first game of basketball was played at what is now Springfield College. The game was invented by a Canadian, Dr. James Naismith,...

Aerosmith Opens Lansdowne Street Music Hall: December 19, 1994
On this day in 1994, Boston-based rock band Aerosmith opened the Mama Kin Music Hall. In the shadow of Fenway Park, the Lansdowne Street facility enjoyed...

First YMCA in the United States Organized in Boston: December 15, 1851
On this day in 1851, a group of evangelicals from several Boston churches founded the first Young Men's Christian Association in the United States....

Henrietta Leavitt Buried in Cambridge: December 14, 1921
On this day in 1921, Henrietta Leavitt, a scientist at the Harvard Observatory, was buried in Cambridge. Her premature death cut short a brilliant career...

The Fortune Sails from Plymouth for England: December 13, 1621
On this day in 1621, the ship Fortune set sail from Plymouth Colony. The arrival of the vessel two weeks earlier — sent by the English investors...

Erastus Bigelow Dies: December 6, 1879
On this day in 1879, Erastus Bigelow, the father of the modern carpet industry, died in Boston. Born in West Boylston, Bigelow and his brother followed...

African Meeting House Opens: December 4, 1806
On this day in 1806, the Reverend Thomas Paul was installed as pastor of the new African Meeting House in Boston. Two days later, the church was officially...

Quakers Outlawed in Plymouth: December 3, 1658
On this day in 1658, Plymouth Court ordered that any boat carrying Quakers to Sandwich be seized to prevent the religious heretics from landing. A year...

Workers Complete Hoosac Tunnel: November 27, 1874
On this day in 1874, workers in the small western Massachusetts town of Florida finished the Hoosac Tunnel, bringing to completion one of the world's...

King Gillette Patents Safety Razor: November 15, 1904
On this day in 1904, Boston-based inventor King Camp Gillette received a patent for an improved safety razor with a disposable blade. After almost 10...

Mercy Otis Marries James Warren: November 14, 1754
On this day in 1754, Mercy Otis of Barnstable and James Warren of Plymouth began their remarkable 54-year partnership. When she married into a family...

First Artificial Snow Falls on Mt. Greylock: November 13, 1946
On this day in 1946, an airplane flew over Mount Greylock in western Massachusetts and seeded the clouds with super-cooled ice crystals. The first-ever...

First Students Arrive at Mt. Holyoke Seminary: November 8, 1837
On this day in 1837, 80 students arrived at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in the Connecticut Valley village of South Hadley. Many had traveled for days...

Islamic Society Breaks Ground in Roxbury: November 7, 2002
...in 2002, the Islamic Society of Boston held a ceremonial groundbreaking in Roxbury for New England's largest mosque and Islamic cultural center....

First Issue of The Atlantic Monthly Published: November 1, 1857
On this day in 1857, the first issue of The Atlantic Monthly magazine was published in Boston. Although none of the articles was signed, most readers...

Washington Ends Visit to Massachusetts: October 31, 1789
On this day in 1789, George Washington concluded a ten-day presidential visit to Massachusetts. Adoring crowds of grateful citizens greeted him everywhere....

Revolutionary War Commander Artemas Ward Dies: October 28, 1800
On this day in 1800, the man who commanded the ragtag American force that chased the British Regulars back to Boston following the battles of Lexington...

Red Sox Win World Series: October 27, 2004
On this day in 2004, the Boston Red Sox ended an 86-year drought and buried the "Curse of the Bambino." They won the World Series! Their...

Senator Edward Brooke Born: October 26, 1919
On this day in 1919, Edward Brooke, III, the only African-American to represent Massachusetts in the U.S. Congress, was born. A decorated veteran, he...

Boston Celebrates Opening of Aqueduct: October 25, 1848
On this day in 1848, 300,000 people from all over New England gathered on Boston Common. They came to celebrate the completion of the city's first...

First National Woman’s Rights Convention Ends in Worcester: October 24, 1850
On this day in 1850, the first national convention for woman's rights concluded in Worcester. For two days, more than 1,000 delegates from 11 different...

First Missionaries Leave for Hawaii: October 23, 1819
On this day in 1819, a crowd gathered on a Boston wharf to bid farewell to the first Protestant missionaries bound for Hawaii. Among them were seven Massachusetts...

Boston Dentist Demonstrates Ether: October 16, 1846
On this day in 1846, a crowd gathered in the operating theater at Massachusetts General Hospital. A Boston printer with a tumor on his jaw lay on the...

Margaret Marshall Appointed to Supreme Judicial Court: October 14, 1999
On this day in 1999, Margaret Marshall became the first woman appointed Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. The oldest court in...

Boston Doctors Use First Iron Lung: October 12, 1928
On this day in 1928, Children's Hospital in Boston was the scene of the first use of an "iron lung." Developed by a young Harvard...

Roger Williams Banished: October 9, 1635
On this day in 1635, Puritan minister Roger Williams was found guilty of spreading "newe & dangerous opinions" and banished...

Balloonist Takes First Aerial Photograph: October 8, 1860
On this day in 1860, Boston newspapers carried an advertisement for an extraordinary event: photographer James Wallace Black would photograph Boston from...

Shoppers’ World Launches Mall Era: October 5, 1951
On this day in 1951, Shoppers' World in Framingham opened for business. The first suburban shopping mall in the Northeast, and only the second in...

Maria Mitchell Discovers Comet: October 1, 1847
On this day in 1847, 29-year-old Maria Mitchell stood on the roof of her parent's Nantucket home, focusing her telescope on what she believed to...

First Newspaper Published in the Colonies: September 25, 1690
On this day in 1690, Boston printer Benjamin Harris produced the first issue of Publick Occurrences, the first newspaper published in Britain's North...

Brookline Amateur Wins U.S. Open: September 19, 1913
On this day in 1913, at The Country Club in Brookline, 20-year-old Francis Ouimet became the first amateur to win the U.S. Open Golf Tournament. Growing...

Boston Lighthouse Lit for the First Time: September 14, 1716
On this day in 1716, Boston Light on Little Brewster Island was lit for the first time. The first lighthouse built in North America, the structure weathered...

Polaroid Wins Patent Suit Against Kodak: September 13, 1985
On this day in 1985, Polaroid won a huge victory in federal court. A judge ruled that Kodak had violated Polaroid's patents for instant photography....

Memorial to Anne Bradstreet Dedicated: September 12, 2000
On this day in 2000, several North Shore communities were celebrating "Anne Bradstreet Week" to mark the 350th anniversary of the poet's...

Massachusetts Audubon Society Makes First Land Purchase: September 9, 1922
On this day in 1922, the Massachusetts Audubon Society purchased its first parcel of land. For $8,000, it acquired 43 acres in the town of Sharon —...

Hasty Pudding Club Forms at Harvard: September 8, 1795
On this day in 1795, 21 Harvard students gathered in a dorm room and formed a secret social club to cultivate "friendship and patriotism."...

Boston Wheelmen Sponsor Nation’s First 100-Mile Bicycle Race: September 6, 1882
On this day in 1882, seven men took over 12 hours to cover the distance from Worcester to Boston in the nation's first 100-mile bicycle race. Boston...

Boston Public Library Receives $1 Million Donation: September 5, 1947
On this day in 1947, self-made millionaire John Deferrari donated over $1,000,000 to the Boston Public Library to express his gratitude to the institution...

Boston Receives First Transcontinental TV Broadcast: September 4, 1951
. . . in 1951, anyone in Boston with access to a television set could be part of history — a program was transmitted live from coast-to-coast...

Massachusetts General Hospital Admits First Patient: September 3, 1821
On this day in 1821, the Massachusetts General Hospital admitted its first patient, a 30-year-old sailor. More than a decade earlier, two Boston doctors...

Washington Commissions First Naval Officer: September 2, 1775
On this day in 1775, General George Washington commissioned Nicholson Broughton captain "in the Army of the United Colonies of North America."...

Nation’s First Subway Opens in Boston: September 1, 1897
On this day in 1897, at 6 am, over 100 people crowded onto the first train to travel through a tunnel under downtown Boston. More than 100,000 people...

Watertown-built Car Climbs Mt. Washington: August 31, 1899
On this day in 1899, Newton inventor F.O. Stanley took his wife Flora for a drive — into the record books. Leaving home in a steam-powered Locomobile,...

Lucy Terry Prince Composes Poem: August 28, 1748
On this day in 1746, Lucy Terry Prince was among the residents of Deerfield traumatized by an Abenaki raid on the village. Lucy, an enslaved woman, described...

Flu Epidemic Begins in Boston: August 27, 1918
On this day in 1918, two sailors housed at Boston's Commonwealth Pier reported to sickbay. The men were the first Americans stricken with a strain...

Harvard Awards Bowditch Honorary Degree: August 25, 1802
On this day in 1802, Harvard College awarded Nathaniel Bowditch an honorary Master's Degree. The Salem-born astronomer, mathematician, and navigator...

Route 128 Opens Boston’s High Tech Age: August 24, 1951
On this day in 1951, the first segment of Route 128 was opened. By 1956, the expressway stretched 65 miles from Gloucester to Braintree. While officials...

Pilgrim Monument Completed in Provincetown: August 21, 1909
On this day in 1909, two young girls, using ropes and a pulley, helped haul the last stone into place to complete the Pilgrim Monument in Provincetown....

Woman’s Rights Pioneer Lucy Stone Born: August 13, 1818
On this day in 1818, woman's rights pioneer Lucy Stone was born on a farm in West Brookfield. Her mother greeted the news that her sixth child was...

Boston Doctors Appeal for Mental Hospital: August 10, 1810
On August 20, 1810, two Boston doctors circulated an appeal for "a hospital for the reception of lunatics and other sick persons." (Some...

Central Artery Project Announced: August 8, 1954
On this day in 1954, The Boston Globe announced the opening of the first elevated expressway in the United States. Hailed as an engineering marvel and...

J.F.K. Signs Bill Creating Cape Cod National Seashore: August 7, 1961
On this day in 1961, President John F. Kennedy signed a bill authorizing the establishment of Cape Cod National Seashore. A long-time summer resident...

Red Sox Retire Yastrzemski’s Number: August 6, 1989
On this day in 1989, the Boston Red Sox retired Carl Yastrzemski's Number 8. Only 20 years old when he took over for the great Ted Williams in left...

Boston Masons Organize First Grand Lodge in America: July 30, 1733
On this day in 1733, 18 men gathered at the Bunch of Grapes Tavern on King Street in Boston and organized the first Masonic Lodge in North America. The...

Foster Furcolo, State’s First Italian American Governor, Born: July 29, 1911
On this day in 1911, Foster Furcolo was born in New Haven. Raised in Connecticut and educated at Yale, Furcolo moved to Springfield after World War II....

First Train Reaches Provincetown: July 22, 1873
On this day in 1873, the first train arrived at the tip of Cape Cod. The streets were bedecked with flags and streamers as 13 bright yellow coach cars,...

Percy Spencer, Inventor of Microwave Oven, Born: July 19, 1894
On this day in 1894, Percy Spencer, the self-taught scientist who discovered the power of microwave technology, was born. With an endlessly curious mind,...

William Pynchon Buys Land for Springfield: July 15, 1635
On this day in 1636, William Pynchon received the deed giving him title to most of what is now Springfield, Longmeadow, and Agawam. In exchange, he paid...

Quincy Shipyard Launches First Nuclear Powered Cruiser: July 14, 1959
On this day in 1959, the nation's first nuclear-powered cruiser was launched from Fore River Shipyard in Quincy. With its deep and sheltered harbor,...

Revere Beach Opens: July 12, 1896
On this day in 1896, 45,000 people gathered in Revere to celebrate the opening of the first public beach in the nation. In 1895 the newly-created Metropolitan...

John Wheatley Purchases a Slave Child: July 11, 1761
On this day in 1761, John Wheatley, a successful merchant, purchased a frail little black girl off a slave ship in Boston. The Wheatleys named her Phillis,...

Ted Shawn Theater Opens at Jacob’s Pillow: July 9, 1942
On this day in 1942, the first theater in the nation dedicated exclusively to dance opened at Jacob's Pillow in Becket, a small town in the Berkshire...

Brookfield Woman Put to Death: July 2, 1778
On this day in 1778, an intelligent and high-spirited beauty from Brookfield became the first woman to be executed in the new American republic. The 32-year-old's...

Legislature Allows Establishment of Mount Auburn Cemetery: June 23, 1831
On this day in 1831, the legislature granted the Massachusetts Horticultural Society permission to purchase land for use as an experimental garden and...

State Acts to Protect Mt. Greylock: June 20, 1898
On this day in 1898, the legislature established the first state park in Massachusetts on Mount Greylock. The tallest peak in the state, at almost 3500...

Charles Goodyear Receives Patent for Vulcanized Rubber: June 15, 1844
On this day in 1844, after a decade of hardship and perseverance, Charles Goodyear received a patent for vulcanized rubber. The first boots and clothing...

Children’s Cancer Research Foundation Incorporated: June 8, 1951
On this day in 1951 the Children's Cancer Research Foundation was incorporated. Founded by pioneering Boston physician Sidney Farber, it was the...

Ellen Swallow Marries Robert Richards: June 4, 1875
On this day in 1875, Ellen Swallow married M.I.T. Professor Robert Hallowell Richards. Three days later, they set off on a wedding trip to Nova Scotia...

Massachusetts Creates Nation’s First Regional Park System: June 3, 1893
On this day in 1893, Governor William Eustis Russell signed a bill creating the Metropolitan Parks Commission, the nation's first regional park system....

54th Massachusetts Regiment Marches Through Boston: May 28, 1863
On this day in 1863, the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, the first black regiment from the North, paraded in full dress uniform on Boston Common....

Explorer Gosnold Names “Cape Cod”: May 15, 1602
On this day in 1602, the English explorer Bartholomew Gosnold dropped anchor off the Massachusetts coast. While he and four others went ashore, the rest...

Globe Publishes First “Confidential Chat”: May 11, 1884
On this day in 1884, The Boston Globe published the first "Housekeepers Column," known since 1922 as "Confidential Chat."...

Ames Brothers Celebrate “Golden Spike”: May 10, 1869
On this day in 1869, officials of the Union Pacific Railroad drove the symbolic "Golden Spike" to mark the completion of the first transcontinental...

Critic Declares Springsteen Future of Rock and Roll: May 9, 1974
On this day in 1974, 25-year-old Bruce Springsteen played at the Harvard Square Theater in Cambridge. Although popular with the college crowd in the Northeast,...

Dewey Proposes Library Classification System: May 8, 1873
On this day in 1873, Amherst College junior Melvil Dewey made a proposal to the faculty. He had been working in the college library and was frustrated...

Winthrop Buys Passage for Ironworkers: May 5, 1643
On this day in 1643, John Winthrop, Jr. paid 50 pounds for the passage of skilled ironworkers from England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Initially,...

Sarah Remond Ejected from Boston Theater: May 4, 1853
On this day in 1853, Sarah Parker Remond and two other African Americans entered a Boston theater intending to enjoy a Mozart opera. When the manager...

Springfield Armory Closes: April 30, 1968
On this day in 1968, there was great sadness in Springfield as the city's historic armory closed its doors after nearly two centuries as the leading...

Boston Jews Petition for First Cemetery: April 29, 1844
On this day in 1844, members of Boston's first Jewish congregation petitioned city officials to set aside a corner of an East Boston cemetery for...

Celtics Coach Red Auerbach Retires: April 28, 1966
On this day in 1966, Red Auerbach retired as head coach of the Boston Celtics after leading the team to 11 championships in 16 years. The Brooklyn native...

Annie Oakley Purchases Smith & Wesson Gun: April 25, 1888
On this day in 1888, Annie Oakley, the star female sharpshooter in Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show, purchased a Model 3 handgun made by the Springfield...

W.E.B. DuBois Returns to Harvard: April 23, 1904
On this day in 1904, W.E.B. DuBois gave a lecture on "the race question" at Harvard, where nine years before he had been the first black...

Telephone Operators Strike: April 20, 1919
On this day in 1919, striking telephone operators in Massachusetts won the right to negotiate with the New England Telephone Company. The young, single...

Battle Begins on Lexington Common: April 19, 1775
On this day in 1775, the first shots were fired in the cause of American independence. In Ralph Waldo Emerson's famous poem, "the shot heard...

G.E. Engineers Test Jet Engine: April 18, 1942
On this day in 1942, after months of highly secret work, GE engineers in Lynn successfully tested the engine they called by the innocuous name "I-A."...

First Whale Watch Departs: April 15, 1975
On this day in 1975 charter boat captain Al Avellar left Provincetown Harbor with a boatload of school children. They were going to look, not fish. This...

Massachusetts Passes First Education Law: April 14, 1642
On this day in 1642, Massachusetts Bay Colony passed the first law in the New World requiring that children be taught to read and write. The English Puritans...

First CCC Enrollees Arrive at Ft. Devens: April 13, 1933
On this day in 1933, the first enrollees of the Massachusetts Civilian Conservation Corps arrived at Fort Devens in Ayer. They were soldiers in a peacetime...

Frances Perkins Born in Boston: April 10, 1880
On this day in 1880, Frances Perkins, the first woman to hold a cabinet position, was born in Boston. Raised in Worcester, she attended Mt. Holyoke College,...

Puritans Leave for Massachusetts: April 7, 1630
On this day in 1630, the last well-wishers stepped off the ship Arabella and returned to shore. More than a week after the vessel first set out, the winds...

UMass Plays in Final Four: March 30, 1996
On this day in 1996, the UMass Minutemen ended the winningest season in UMass basketball history. Coached by John Calipari and led by future NBA star...

Dorothea Dix Begins Her Crusade: March 28, 1841
On this day in 1841, Dorothea Dix visited an East Cambridge jail and was appalled to see mentally ill women confined alongside hardened criminals. The...

Jordan Marsh Announces New Store: March 27, 1947
On this day in 1947, Jordan, Marsh and Company announced that it was going to build "the greatest department store in the world" in...

Legislature Guarantees Access to Public Schools: March 25, 1845
On this day in 1845, the Massachusetts legislature guaranteed that every child in the state would have access to a public school. One source of pressure...

Birth Control Pioneer Born: March 24, 1890
On this day in 1890, birth control pioneer John Rock was born in the small Massachusetts town of Marlborough. He was a deeply religious Catholic even...

Anne Hutchinson Banished: March 22, 1638
On this day in 1638, Anne Hutchinson was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Three years after arriving in Boston, she found herself the first...

Boston Burns: March 20, 1760
On this day in 1760, the dreaded cry of "Fire!" roused sleeping Bostonians. Over the next ten hours, the worst fire to strike a colonial...

Boston Celebrates First Evacuation Day: March 17, 1901
On this day in 1901, the City of Boston officially celebrated Evacuation Day for the first time. In early March of 1776, Continental troops managed to...

Robert Goddard Launches Space Age: March 16, 1926
On this day in 1926, Clark University physics professor Robert Goddard launched the world's first liquid fuel rocket — and with it the space...

Eli Whitney Patents the Cotton Gin: March 14, 1794
On this day in 1794, Westborough native Eli Whitney applied for a patent on the cotton gin. Raised on a farm in Massachusetts, he invented a machine that...

Charlotte Forten Enters Salem Normal School: March 13, 1855
On this day in 1855, Charlotte Forten passed the entrance examination for the Salem Normal School, one of four colleges recently established in Massachusetts...

Sophia Smith Endows New Women’s College: March 8, 1870
On this day in 1870, a shy but determined woman from Hatfield willed that her fortune be used to establish a women's college in Northampton. The...

Alexander Graham Bell Receives First Patent: March 7, 1876
On this day in 1876, Alexander Graham Bell received a patent for the telephone. Born in Scotland, Bell settled in Boston when he was in his early 20s....

Clarence Birdseye Tests Frozen Food: March 6, 1930
On this day in 1930, shoppers in Springfield became the first Americans to find frozen food in their grocery stores. A test marketing program was designed...

Globe Publishes First Edition: March 4, 1872
On this day in 1872, a brand-new newspaper hit the streets of Boston. Costing four cents, the Globe had twice the number of pages as most competitors...

Ruiz Wins World Heavyweight Championship: March 3, 2001
On this day in 2001, boxer Johnny Ruiz of Chelsea defeated Evander Holyfield in 12 rounds to become the first-ever Latino WBA heavyweight champion. Trained...

Perkins School for the Blind Incorporated: March 2, 1829
On this day in 1829, the New England Asylum for the Blind was incorporated in Boston. Begun with six students, within six years, the institution had ten...

First Slaves Arrive in Massachusetts: February 26, 1638
On this day in 1638, a ship returned to Salem from the West Indies after a seven-month voyage. Its cargo included cotton, tobacco and, as far as we know,...

U.S. Hockey Team Wins Olympic Gold: February 24, 1980
On this day in 1980, the U.S. hockey team beat Finland to win the Gold Medal at the Lake Placid Olympics. What really captured the country's imagination...

Angelina Grimke Addresses Legislature: February 21, 1838
On this day in 1838 a woman addressed a legislative body for the first time in American history. An overflow crowd gathered at the State House in Boston...

Natick Established: February 19, 1781
On this day in 1781, Natick was formally incorporated, but the town already had a long history. In 1651, a group of Christianized Indians had founded...

Mt. Holyoke Cable Car Burned: February 17, 1965
On this day in 1965, Massachusetts officials burned what was left of the wooden tramway that had carried thousands of people to the summit of Mt. Holyoke....

First Esperanto Society Formed: February 16, 1905
On this day in 1905, the first Esperanto Society in the United States was established in Boston. Invented by a Polish doctor in the 1880s, Esperanto was...

First American-Made Valentines Sold: February 14, 1849
On this day in 1849, the first American-made valentines were sold in Worcester. They were designed and made by Esther Howland, the daughter of a local...

“Gerrymander” Born in Massachusetts: February 11, 1812
On this day in 1812, a political monster — the "Gerrymander" — was born in the Massachusetts State House. Governor...

Lewis Latimer Awarded First Patent: February 10, 1874
On this day in 1874, inventor Lewis Latimer received his first patent. The son of a Virginia couple who had escaped from slavery, he was born and raised...

Holyoke Man Invents Volleyball: February 9, 1895
On this day in 1895, a new game was first played at the YMCA in Holyoke. Many of the men who came to the Y were excited about another new game, basketball,...

Tenley Albright Wins Olympic Gold: February 3, 1956
On this day in 1956, figure skater Tenley Albright won the Gold Medal at the Olympic Games in Cortina, Italy. This should not have been a surprise but...

Father of Psychology Born: February 1, 1844
On this day in 1844 G. Stanley Hall was born in Ashfield. This farm boy from western Massachusetts would become the father of psychology in America. His...

First African American Graduate of Harvard Born: January 30, 1844
On this day in 1844, Richard Greener, the first African-American graduate of Harvard, was born. His unusual education was made possible by several wealthy...

Julia Ward Howe Elected to American Academy of Arts: January 28, 1908
On this day in 1908, 89-year-old Julia Ward Howe became the first woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Howe lived most of her long...

Sixth Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment Organized: January 21, 1861
On this day in 1861, the Sixth Massachusetts Volunteer Militia was formally organized. With war approaching, men who worked in the textile cities of Lowell...

UMass Researchers Clone Calves: January 20, 1998
On this day in 1998, two researchers affiliated with the University of Massachusetts drew worldwide attention when they went public with a birth announcement....

Isaiah Thomas Born: January 19, 1749
On this day in 1749, the Patriot printer Isaiah Thomas was born. In 1770, Thomas established the Massachusetts Spy, the first newspaper aimed at middle-class...

Marconi Transmits Radio Message: January 18, 1903
On this day in 1903, Guglielmo Marconi, the Italian inventor of wireless telegraphy, arrived on Cape Cod hoping to make history. The night was cold but...

Nation’s First Country Club Established: January 14, 1882
On this day in 1882, a group of men from the social elite of Boston formally established The Country Club of Brookline, the first such club in the United...

JFK’s Farewell to Massachusetts Legislature: January 9, 1961
On this day in 1961, John F. Kennedy bade farewell to the people of Massachusetts and reminded them of the state's unique legacy. In a speech at...

Emily Greene Balch Born: January 8, 1867
On this day in 1867, Emily Balch was born in Jamaica Plain. Her parents' affluence and enlightened views allowed her to attend college at a time...

Boston Swears in First Irish-born Mayor: January 5, 1885
On this day in 1885, Hugh O'Brien, the first Irish immigrant elected mayor of Boston, took the oath of office. A new era was beginning. For several...

Harry “Bucky” Lew Born: January 4, 1884
On this day in 1884, Harry Haskell Lew was born in Lowell to a family that had long been active in the struggle for racial equality. Known from childhood...

Brownies Take a Winter Swim: January 1, 1904
On this day in 1904, the L Street Brownies held their first New Year's Day swim in Boston Harbor. Every year since then, a crowd of swimmers and...

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