Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Fri, 20 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities UMass Researchers Clone Calves: January 20, 1998 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=23 On this day in 1998, two researchers affiliated with the University of Massachusetts drew worldwide attention when they went public with a birth announcement. The new arrivals, named Charlie and George, were genetically-identical Holstein calves. They were produced by new techniques that involved splicing human genes onto cow DNA and then cloning the animals. By cloning an already genetically-altered cow, the UMass team could then create a genetically-engineered herd. This made it possible to produce therapeutically altered milk in large enough quantities to be useful in creating drugs to treat human disease. Less famous than Dolly, the sheep cloned in Scotland, the UMass cows represented a great step forward in the effort to develop medicines using farm animals. Fri, 20 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=23 On this day in 1998, two researchers affiliated with the University of Massachusetts drew worldwide attention when they went public with a birth announcement. The new arrivals, named Charlie and George, were genetically-identical Holstein calves. They were produced by new techniques that involved splicing human genes onto cow DNA and then cloning the animals. By cloning an already genetically-altered cow, the UMass team could then create a genetically-engineered herd. This made it possible to produce therapeutically altered milk in large enough quantities to be useful in creating drugs to treat human disease. Less famous than Dolly, the sheep cloned in Scotland, the UMass cows represented a great step forward in the effort to develop medicines using farm animals. no 0:01:00 UMass Researchers Clone Calves: January 20, 1998 Isaiah Thomas Born: January 19, 1749 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=24 On this day in 1749, the Patriot printer Isaiah Thomas was born. In 1770, Thomas established the Massachusetts Spy, the first newspaper aimed at middle-class readers. While other papers were happy with 400 subscribers, the Spy had a circulation of 3,500. Thomas used the Spy to rally support for the cause of independence. Targeted by the British, he smuggled his press out of Boston to Worcester a few days before the Battle of Lexington and Concord. There, he continued publishing his newspaper. After the war, Thomas became the foremost publisher and printer in America. In 1812, he established the American Antiquarian Society, which today is one of the nation's most complete collections of printed work. Thu, 19 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=24 On this day in 1749, the Patriot printer Isaiah Thomas was born. In 1770, Thomas established the Massachusetts Spy, the first newspaper aimed at middle-class readers. While other papers were happy with 400 subscribers, the Spy had a circulation of 3,500. Thomas used the Spy to rally support for the cause of independence. Targeted by the British, he smuggled his press out of Boston to Worcester a few days before the Battle of Lexington and Concord. There, he continued publishing his newspaper. After the war, Thomas became the foremost publisher and printer in America. In 1812, he established the American Antiquarian Society, which today is one of the nation's most complete collections of printed work. no 0:01:00 Isaiah Thomas Born: January 19, 1749 Marconi Transmits Radio Message : January 18, 1903 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=22 On this day in 1903, Guglielmo Marconi, the Italian inventor of wireless telegraphy, arrived on Cape Cod hoping to make history. The night was cold but perfectly clear, and the first trans-Atlantic radio transmission, a message from President Theodore Roosevelt to King Edward VII, was carried directly from Wellfleet to England. The lifesaving value of this new technology was first evident on January 23, 1909, when the ocean liner Republic collided with another ship and began to sink. The radio operator sent out a distress signal. The station in Wellfleet received the call and alerted other ships in the area. Almost all the passengers were rescued, and Marconi became a popular hero. He won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1909. Wed, 18 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=22 On this day in 1903, Guglielmo Marconi, the Italian inventor of wireless telegraphy, arrived on Cape Cod hoping to make history. The night was cold but perfectly clear, and the first trans-Atlantic radio transmission, a message from President Theodore Roosevelt to King Edward VII, was carried directly from Wellfleet to England. The lifesaving value of this new technology was first evident on January 23, 1909, when the ocean liner Republic collided with another ship and began to sink. The radio operator sent out a distress signal. The station in Wellfleet received the call and alerted other ships in the area. Almost all the passengers were rescued, and Marconi became a popular hero. He won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1909. no 0:01:00 Marconi Transmits Radio Message : January 18, 1903 Robert Cormier Born: January 17, 1925 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=21 On this day in 1925, author Robert Cormier was born into Leominster's tight-knit French-Canadian neighborhood, and he remained there for the rest of his life. After graduating from Fitchburg State College, he began a 30-year career as a newspaperman. But it was the novels he wrote for young adults that earned him a national reputation. A cheerful, mild-mannered man himself, he created characters caught in the grip of self-doubt, peer pressure, and adult expectation. When Fitchburg State established a Cormier Archive in 1981, the author expressed surprise that anyone would want his old papers. "It's nice, though, to have all those boxes out of the house," he said. "The closets were getting pretty full, and my wife was starting to complain." Tue, 17 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=21 On this day in 1925, author Robert Cormier was born into Leominster's tight-knit French-Canadian neighborhood, and he remained there for the rest of his life. After graduating from Fitchburg State College, he began a 30-year career as a newspaperman. But it was the novels he wrote for young adults that earned him a national reputation. A cheerful, mild-mannered man himself, he created characters caught in the grip of self-doubt, peer pressure, and adult expectation. When Fitchburg State established a Cormier Archive in 1981, the author expressed surprise that anyone would want his old papers. "It's nice, though, to have all those boxes out of the house," he said. "The closets were getting pretty full, and my wife was starting to complain." no 0:01:00 Robert Cormier Born: January 17, 1925 First Legal Sea Foods Lost to Fire: January 16, 1980 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=20 On this day in 1980, fire destroyed the original Legal Sea Foods fish market and restaurant in Cambridge. The restaurant re-opened, but the business soon outgrew the neighborhood. Today there are 30 family-owned Legal Sea Foods restaurants. All bear the same incongruous name, which goes back to the company's roots. In 1904, Harry Berkowitz called his Inman Square store Legal Cash Market because his customers could redeem legal, government-issued cash stamps there. When his son branched out into fish, he kept the "legal" name. Now his grandson runs the company out of a 75,000-square-foot headquarters overlooking Boston Harbor. On the roof sits a 45-foot-long stainless steel sculpture of a New England cod. Mon, 16 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=20 On this day in 1980, fire destroyed the original Legal Sea Foods fish market and restaurant in Cambridge. The restaurant re-opened, but the business soon outgrew the neighborhood. Today there are 30 family-owned Legal Sea Foods restaurants. All bear the same incongruous name, which goes back to the company's roots. In 1904, Harry Berkowitz called his Inman Square store Legal Cash Market because his customers could redeem legal, government-issued cash stamps there. When his son branched out into fish, he kept the "legal" name. Now his grandson runs the company out of a 75,000-square-foot headquarters overlooking Boston Harbor. On the roof sits a 45-foot-long stainless steel sculpture of a New England cod. no 0:01:00 First Legal Sea Foods Lost to Fire: January 16, 1980 Great Molasses Flood : January 15, 1919 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=19 On this day in 1919, people in Boston's North End were startled by a loud rumbling noise. They watched in horror as a five-story tank broke apart, unleashing a wave of molasses 15 feet high and 160 feet wide. Moving at 35 miles per hour, it traveled over two blocks and engulfed everything in its path. The disaster killed 21 people, injured 150, and caused property damage of more than $100,000,000 in today's dollars. The tank's owners claimed that anarchists had dynamited it as a protest against the American government. In fact, the tank had been hastily constructed and overloaded. Years later, the tank's owner was found liable and ordered to pay compensation to the victims. Sun, 15 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=19 On this day in 1919, people in Boston's North End were startled by a loud rumbling noise. They watched in horror as a five-story tank broke apart, unleashing a wave of molasses 15 feet high and 160 feet wide. Moving at 35 miles per hour, it traveled over two blocks and engulfed everything in its path. The disaster killed 21 people, injured 150, and caused property damage of more than $100,000,000 in today's dollars. The tank's owners claimed that anarchists had dynamited it as a protest against the American government. In fact, the tank had been hastily constructed and overloaded. Years later, the tank's owner was found liable and ordered to pay compensation to the victims. no 0:01:00 Great Molasses Flood : January 15, 1919 Nation's First Country Club Established: January 14, 1882 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=18 On this day in 1882, a group of men from the social elite of Boston formally established The Country Club of Brookline, the first such club in the United States. Only four miles from the center of Boston, Brookline attracted well-to-do families who could afford to get away from the city for the summer. After the Civil War, many of these families turned their summer retreats into year-round suburban residences. Country clubs offered horseback riding, shooting, tennis, and the newest sport, golf, in a pastoral setting not far from home. Unlike downtown city clubs, which were restricted to men, country clubs also allowed wives and children to participate in their activities. But not all families were welcome. Membership was by invitation only. Sat, 14 Jan 2017 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=18 On this day in 1882, a group of men from the social elite of Boston formally established The Country Club of Brookline, the first such club in the United States. Only four miles from the center of Boston, Brookline attracted well-to-do families who could afford to get away from the city for the summer. After the Civil War, many of these families turned their summer retreats into year-round suburban residences. Country clubs offered horseback riding, shooting, tennis, and the newest sport, golf, in a pastoral setting not far from home. Unlike downtown city clubs, which were restricted to men, country clubs also allowed wives and children to participate in their activities. But not all families were welcome. Membership was by invitation only. no 0:01:00 Nation's First Country Club Established: January 14, 1882