Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Wed, 23 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities W.E.B. DuBois Returns to Harvard: April 23, 1904 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=122 On this day in 1904, W.E.B. DuBois gave a lecture on "the race question" at Harvard, where nine years before he had been the first black person to receive a Ph.D. From his childhood in Great Barrington, where he was relatively sheltered from racism, to his old age in Africa, where he moved to escape it, DuBois devoted his energies and talents to helping his fellow African Americans gain political and economic power. Founder of the NAACP, he later became more militant than most of its members. His involvement in the Pan-African Movement led him to support African independence. He moved to Ghana in his 90s and died there on August 27, 1963, the very eve of the historic civil rights march on Washington. Wed, 23 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=122 On this day in 1904, W.E.B. DuBois gave a lecture on "the race question" at Harvard, where nine years before he had been the first black person to receive a Ph.D. From his childhood in Great Barrington, where he was relatively sheltered from racism, to his old age in Africa, where he moved to escape it, DuBois devoted his energies and talents to helping his fellow African Americans gain political and economic power. Founder of the NAACP, he later became more militant than most of its members. His involvement in the Pan-African Movement led him to support African independence. He moved to Ghana in his 90s and died there on August 27, 1963, the very eve of the historic civil rights march on Washington. no 0:01:00 W.E.B. DuBois Returns to Harvard: April 23, 1904 Poet Anne Sexton Publishes First Book: April 22, 1960 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=121 On this day in 1960, Massachusetts poet Anne Sexton had her first collection of poems published, To Bedlam and Part Way Back. Just before the manuscript was to go to press, she made major changes in "Her Kind," a poem that had been rejected by literary journals, and included it in the book. From then on, she began all her readings with this poem. She formed a band called "Anne Sexton and Her Kind" to accompany her. Anne Sexton achieved great literary success, winning the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1966 but never overcame the mental illness from which she suffered all her adult life. In 1974 she committed suicide. She was 46 years old. Tue, 22 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=121 On this day in 1960, Massachusetts poet Anne Sexton had her first collection of poems published, To Bedlam and Part Way Back. Just before the manuscript was to go to press, she made major changes in "Her Kind," a poem that had been rejected by literary journals, and included it in the book. From then on, she began all her readings with this poem. She formed a band called "Anne Sexton and Her Kind" to accompany her. Anne Sexton achieved great literary success, winning the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1966 but never overcame the mental illness from which she suffered all her adult life. In 1974 she committed suicide. She was 46 years old. no 0:01:00 Poet Anne Sexton Publishes First Book: April 22, 1960 Rosie Ruiz Steals Boston Marathon: April 21, 1980 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=120 On this day in 1980 Rosie Ruiz tried to steal the Boston Marathon. Crowned the women's champion when she crossed the finish line, Ruiz looked surprisingly well-rested for someone who had just run 26 miles in record time. Jackie Gareau, whom the crowd had cheered on as the women's leader for the last half of the race, arrived at the finish line just in time to see officials bestow the traditional laurel wreath on Ruiz. Doubts surfaced immediately. In the thousands of photos and extensive film shot at the event, Ruiz appeared only in the last half-mile. After eight days of controversy, Rosie Ruiz was stripped of her title, but she maintained her innocence and refused to return her medal. Mon, 21 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=120 On this day in 1980 Rosie Ruiz tried to steal the Boston Marathon. Crowned the women's champion when she crossed the finish line, Ruiz looked surprisingly well-rested for someone who had just run 26 miles in record time. Jackie Gareau, whom the crowd had cheered on as the women's leader for the last half of the race, arrived at the finish line just in time to see officials bestow the traditional laurel wreath on Ruiz. Doubts surfaced immediately. In the thousands of photos and extensive film shot at the event, Ruiz appeared only in the last half-mile. After eight days of controversy, Rosie Ruiz was stripped of her title, but she maintained her innocence and refused to return her medal. no 0:01:00 Rosie Ruiz Steals Boston Marathon: April 21, 1980 Telephone Operators Strike: April 20, 1919 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=119 On this day in 1919, striking telephone operators in Massachusetts won the right to negotiate with the New England Telephone Company. The young, single women who had flooded into the industry in the early 1900s wanted higher wages and better working conditions. When they took off their headsets and walked off the job, they brought business in New England to a standstill. Government officials and industry executives were surprised by the women's organization and determination. In less than a week, the phone company agreed to the strikers' demands. The victorious operators returned to work, but within a few years, they would face a greater threat: the self-dial telephone. Manually-operated switchboards would soon be more common in museums than city telephone offices. Sun, 20 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=119 On this day in 1919, striking telephone operators in Massachusetts won the right to negotiate with the New England Telephone Company. The young, single women who had flooded into the industry in the early 1900s wanted higher wages and better working conditions. When they took off their headsets and walked off the job, they brought business in New England to a standstill. Government officials and industry executives were surprised by the women's organization and determination. In less than a week, the phone company agreed to the strikers' demands. The victorious operators returned to work, but within a few years, they would face a greater threat: the self-dial telephone. Manually-operated switchboards would soon be more common in museums than city telephone offices. no 0:01:00 Telephone Operators Strike: April 20, 1919 Battle Begins on Lexington Common: April 19, 1775 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=118 On this day in 1775, the first shots were fired in the cause of American independence. In Ralph Waldo Emerson's famous poem, "the shot heard 'round the world" came from the musket of a Concord militiaman. In reality, the first blood was shed hours before the Redcoats reached the Old North Bridge. The confrontation on Lexington Common between 77 militiamen and nearly ten times that number of British Regulars ended with the death of eight Lexington men. The Redcoats moved on to Concord. When they got there, they found several thousand farmer-soldiers who had already heard of the bloodshed at Lexington. With their nerves steeled, the Americans drove the Redcoats back to Boston and placed the city under siege. The Revolution had begun. Sat, 19 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=118 On this day in 1775, the first shots were fired in the cause of American independence. In Ralph Waldo Emerson's famous poem, "the shot heard 'round the world" came from the musket of a Concord militiaman. In reality, the first blood was shed hours before the Redcoats reached the Old North Bridge. The confrontation on Lexington Common between 77 militiamen and nearly ten times that number of British Regulars ended with the death of eight Lexington men. The Redcoats moved on to Concord. When they got there, they found several thousand farmer-soldiers who had already heard of the bloodshed at Lexington. With their nerves steeled, the Americans drove the Redcoats back to Boston and placed the city under siege. The Revolution had begun. no 0:01:00 Battle Begins on Lexington Common: April 19, 1775 G.E. Engineers Test Jet Engine: April 18, 1942 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=117 On this day in 1942, after months of highly secret work, GE engineers in Lynn successfully tested the engine they called by the innocuous name "I-A." It was the first jet engine built in the United States. An English scientist had designed a jet engine in 1941. When an Air Force general saw it power a plane, he was impressed enough to award General Electric a contract to adapt the design to American specifications. Installed with two of these I-A engines, a Bell P-59A aircraft made its maiden flight in the fall of 1942. Building on its success in Lynn, GE's Aircraft Engine division has since become the world's leading producer of jet engines used in commercial and military aircraft. Fri, 18 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=117 On this day in 1942, after months of highly secret work, GE engineers in Lynn successfully tested the engine they called by the innocuous name "I-A." It was the first jet engine built in the United States. An English scientist had designed a jet engine in 1941. When an Air Force general saw it power a plane, he was impressed enough to award General Electric a contract to adapt the design to American specifications. Installed with two of these I-A engines, a Bell P-59A aircraft made its maiden flight in the fall of 1942. Building on its success in Lynn, GE's Aircraft Engine division has since become the world's leading producer of jet engines used in commercial and military aircraft. no 0:01:00 G.E. Engineers Test Jet Engine: April 18, 1942 "Mill Girl" Writer Lucy Larcom Dies: April 17, 1893 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=116 On this day in 1893, Lucy Larcom died. A popular poet during her lifetime, she would be forgotten today except for a work of prose that she wrote in 1889. Her autobiography, A New England Girlhood, tells the story of her early childhood in the coastal village of Beverly and her move to Lowell, the mill town on the Merrimack River, where she lived and worked for more than a decade. She was a regular contributor to the Lowell Offering. The magazine was published by a group of "mill girls," as the young women who made up the great majority of workers in Massachusetts textile factories were called. Larcom's reputation as a poet soon faded, but A New England Girlhood remains an American classic. Thu, 17 Apr 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=116 On this day in 1893, Lucy Larcom died. A popular poet during her lifetime, she would be forgotten today except for a work of prose that she wrote in 1889. Her autobiography, A New England Girlhood, tells the story of her early childhood in the coastal village of Beverly and her move to Lowell, the mill town on the Merrimack River, where she lived and worked for more than a decade. She was a regular contributor to the Lowell Offering. The magazine was published by a group of "mill girls," as the young women who made up the great majority of workers in Massachusetts textile factories were called. Larcom's reputation as a poet soon faded, but A New England Girlhood remains an American classic. no 0:01:00 "Mill Girl" Writer Lucy Larcom Dies: April 17, 1893