Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Sat, 25 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Last Elevated Train Runs in Boston: June 25, 2004 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=185 On this day in 2004, Boston's last elevated train pulled into North Station. For over a century, Bostonians had avoided the congested streets below by riding trains carried on huge steel tracks overhead. When the El was built in 1901, people were thrilled to pay the five-cent fare to travel in mahogany-paneled cars from one shiny station to another. But over time city officials and most residents came to see the once-elegant El as a noisy eyesore. Gradually elevated lines were replaced with subways, and the tracks were demolished. The final run of the Green Line trolley on the last half-mile of elevated track marked a milestone in the modernization of the nation's oldest subway system, and, at the same time, the end of an era. Sat, 25 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=185 On this day in 2004, Boston's last elevated train pulled into North Station. For over a century, Bostonians had avoided the congested streets below by riding trains carried on huge steel tracks overhead. When the El was built in 1901, people were thrilled to pay the five-cent fare to travel in mahogany-paneled cars from one shiny station to another. But over time city officials and most residents came to see the once-elegant El as a noisy eyesore. Gradually elevated lines were replaced with subways, and the tracks were demolished. The final run of the Green Line trolley on the last half-mile of elevated track marked a milestone in the modernization of the nation's oldest subway system, and, at the same time, the end of an era. no 0:01:00 Last Elevated Train Runs in Boston: June 25, 2004 King Philip's War Breaks Out: June 24, 1675 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=184 On this day in 1675, Wampanoag warriors killed seven colonists in Swansea in retaliation for a series of injustices suffered at the hands of the English. This raid is generally considered the beginning of King Philip's War, a bloody conflict that would involve every New England colony and all the peoples of the Algonquian nation. Over the next year, members of the Abenaki, Narragansett, Nipmuc, and Wampanoag tribes attacked more than half of all the settlements in New England and reduced about a dozen towns in Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay colonies to ashes. By August of 1676, more than 600 settlers had died and 1,200 homes had been burned. An estimated 3,000 Native Americans died at the hands of the English. Fri, 24 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=184 On this day in 1675, Wampanoag warriors killed seven colonists in Swansea in retaliation for a series of injustices suffered at the hands of the English. This raid is generally considered the beginning of King Philip's War, a bloody conflict that would involve every New England colony and all the peoples of the Algonquian nation. Over the next year, members of the Abenaki, Narragansett, Nipmuc, and Wampanoag tribes attacked more than half of all the settlements in New England and reduced about a dozen towns in Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay colonies to ashes. By August of 1676, more than 600 settlers had died and 1,200 homes had been burned. An estimated 3,000 Native Americans died at the hands of the English. no 0:01:00 King Philip's War Breaks Out: June 24, 1675 Legislature Allows Establishment of Mount Auburn Cemetery: June 23, 1831 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=183 On this day in 1831, the legislature granted the Massachusetts Horticultural Society permission to purchase land for use as an experimental garden and a rural cemetery. Located on the border of Cambridge and Watertown, the garden failed, but the cemetery became world famous. As the first rural cemetery in America, Mount Auburn pioneered the idea of burying the dead not in urban churchyards but in a beautifully designed, naturalistic landscape on the outskirts of the city. The idea caught on and eventually led to the creation of public parks in metropolitan areas. 180 years after the cemetery was consecrated, the dead are still being laid to rest along Mount Auburn's winding paths, in her wooded dells, and on her gentle hillsides. Thu, 23 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=183 On this day in 1831, the legislature granted the Massachusetts Horticultural Society permission to purchase land for use as an experimental garden and a rural cemetery. Located on the border of Cambridge and Watertown, the garden failed, but the cemetery became world famous. As the first rural cemetery in America, Mount Auburn pioneered the idea of burying the dead not in urban churchyards but in a beautifully designed, naturalistic landscape on the outskirts of the city. The idea caught on and eventually led to the creation of public parks in metropolitan areas. 180 years after the cemetery was consecrated, the dead are still being laid to rest along Mount Auburn's winding paths, in her wooded dells, and on her gentle hillsides. no 0:01:00 Legislature Allows Establishment of Mount Auburn Cemetery: June 23, 1831 Quabbin Reservoir Filled to the Brim: June 22, 1946 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=182 On this day in 1946, water flowed over the spillway and officials declared Quabbin Reservoir full. Construction took more than 20 years and required the obliteration of four towns in the Swift River Valley. More than a thousand structures were dismantled -- homes, barns, churches, schools, stores. Workers painstakingly removed 7,613 graves and re-interred the dead in a new cemetery. When it was completed, Quabbin was the largest man-made reservoir in the world. Today it is the principal source of drinking water for people in 46 metropolitan Boston communities. To ensure the quality of the water, the state has protected over 56,000 acres of surrounding land. The result is one of the largest and most diverse wilderness areas in Massachusetts. Wed, 22 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=182 On this day in 1946, water flowed over the spillway and officials declared Quabbin Reservoir full. Construction took more than 20 years and required the obliteration of four towns in the Swift River Valley. More than a thousand structures were dismantled -- homes, barns, churches, schools, stores. Workers painstakingly removed 7,613 graves and re-interred the dead in a new cemetery. When it was completed, Quabbin was the largest man-made reservoir in the world. Today it is the principal source of drinking water for people in 46 metropolitan Boston communities. To ensure the quality of the water, the state has protected over 56,000 acres of surrounding land. The result is one of the largest and most diverse wilderness areas in Massachusetts. no 0:01:00 Quabbin Reservoir Filled to the Brim: June 22, 1946 James Otis, Jr., Enrages Colonial Governor: June 21, 1768 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=181 On this day in 1768, James Otis, Jr. gave a characteristically fiery speech to his fellow legislators in Boston. He referred to the British House of Commons as a gathering of "button-makers, horse jockey gamesters, pensioners, pimps, and whore-masters." The colony's royal governor denounced Otis's tirade as the most "insolent. . . treasonable declamation that perhaps was ever delivered." Otis's speech in June 1768 was one of many that attacked Parliament for its efforts to squeeze more revenue from the American colonies. His insistence that "a man's house is his castle" and later that there be "no taxation without representation" remain etched in our collective memory long after his name, and his role in the events leading up to the Revolution, have been forgotten. Tue, 21 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=181 On this day in 1768, James Otis, Jr. gave a characteristically fiery speech to his fellow legislators in Boston. He referred to the British House of Commons as a gathering of "button-makers, horse jockey gamesters, pensioners, pimps, and whore-masters." The colony's royal governor denounced Otis's tirade as the most "insolent. . . treasonable declamation that perhaps was ever delivered." Otis's speech in June 1768 was one of many that attacked Parliament for its efforts to squeeze more revenue from the American colonies. His insistence that "a man's house is his castle" and later that there be "no taxation without representation" remain etched in our collective memory long after his name, and his role in the events leading up to the Revolution, have been forgotten. no 0:01:00 James Otis, Jr., Enrages Colonial Governor: June 21, 1768 State Acts to Protect Mt. Greylock: June 20, 1898 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=180 On this day in 1898, the legislature established the first state park in Massachusetts on Mount Greylock. The tallest peak in the state, at almost 3500 feet, Greylock is like an island, different in geology, climate, and ecology from its Berkshire County surroundings. But its isolation did not protect it. By the late 1800s, unregulated logging threatened to deforest its slopes. In 1885 a group of concerned citizens bought 400 acres around the summit. In 1898 they turned the land over to the state to protect it forever. In the years since then, the Commonwealth has added 285,000 acres to the state park system, 12,500 of them on Mt. Greylock, making the Massachusetts state park system the ninth largest in the country. Mon, 20 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=180 On this day in 1898, the legislature established the first state park in Massachusetts on Mount Greylock. The tallest peak in the state, at almost 3500 feet, Greylock is like an island, different in geology, climate, and ecology from its Berkshire County surroundings. But its isolation did not protect it. By the late 1800s, unregulated logging threatened to deforest its slopes. In 1885 a group of concerned citizens bought 400 acres around the summit. In 1898 they turned the land over to the state to protect it forever. In the years since then, the Commonwealth has added 285,000 acres to the state park system, 12,500 of them on Mt. Greylock, making the Massachusetts state park system the ninth largest in the country. no 0:01:00 State Acts to Protect Mt. Greylock: June 20, 1898 Governor Honors Activist Melnea Cass: June 19, 1968 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=179 On this day in 1968, Governor John Volpe dedicated the Melnea Cass Swimming and Skating Rink in Roxbury. The new facility was intended to improve life in inner city Boston. It was named for a woman who had dedicated her life to the same cause. Melnea Cass had spent nearly half a century working for economic and racial justice. Admired for her selflessness, common sense, and generosity, she was respected by the city's power brokers as a forceful and effective advocate for social change. When she died in 1978, Mrs. Cass had received honorary doctorates and been named "Massachusetts Mother of the Year" and a "Grand Bostonian." The honors did not end with her death. Melnea Cass Boulevard in Lower Roxbury opened in the summer of 1981. Sun, 19 Jun 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=179 On this day in 1968, Governor John Volpe dedicated the Melnea Cass Swimming and Skating Rink in Roxbury. The new facility was intended to improve life in inner city Boston. It was named for a woman who had dedicated her life to the same cause. Melnea Cass had spent nearly half a century working for economic and racial justice. Admired for her selflessness, common sense, and generosity, she was respected by the city's power brokers as a forceful and effective advocate for social change. When she died in 1978, Mrs. Cass had received honorary doctorates and been named "Massachusetts Mother of the Year" and a "Grand Bostonian." The honors did not end with her death. Melnea Cass Boulevard in Lower Roxbury opened in the summer of 1981. no 0:01:00 Governor Honors Activist Melnea Cass: June 19, 1968