Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Mon, 27 Apr 2015 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Activists Erect "Tent City" in Boston : April 27, 1968 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=126 On this day in 1968, hundreds of demonstrators occupied a parking lot in Boston's South End. Houses on the site had recently been demolished, and their occupants displaced. To protest this kind of "urban renewal," neighborhood activists created a temporary "tent city." Along with thousands of supporters, they spent a long weekend at what one reporter called "an impromptu urban fair." Thanks to an attentive media, they won public sympathy for their cause. After four days, the protesters left the site. They did not, however, give up the fight for affordable housing in Boston. It took 20 years, but their persistence paid off. The parking lot was eventually transformed into the Tent City development that is now home to several hundred mixed-income families. Mon, 27 Apr 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=126 On this day in 1968, hundreds of demonstrators occupied a parking lot in Boston's South End. Houses on the site had recently been demolished, and their occupants displaced. To protest this kind of "urban renewal," neighborhood activists created a temporary "tent city." Along with thousands of supporters, they spent a long weekend at what one reporter called "an impromptu urban fair." Thanks to an attentive media, they won public sympathy for their cause. After four days, the protesters left the site. They did not, however, give up the fight for affordable housing in Boston. It took 20 years, but their persistence paid off. The parking lot was eventually transformed into the Tent City development that is now home to several hundred mixed-income families. no 0:01:00 Activists Erect "Tent City" in Boston : April 27, 1968 "The Birth of a Nation" Sparks Protest: April 26, 1915 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=125 On this day in 1915 Boston's African-American community protested the showing of the racist film The Birth of a Nation. When 800 black women gathered at a Baptist church, one speaker suggested that "if there are men here who are afraid to die there are women who are not afraid. This [movie] would not be tolerated if it affected any other race or people." In spite of rallies and demonstrations, the film opened on April 17, 1915, at the Tremont Theater. While African Americans protested, thousands of white Bostonians flocked to the film. Quite possibly the most controversial movie ever produced, The Birth of a Nation also has the distinction of being the first film shown in the White House. Sun, 26 Apr 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=125 On this day in 1915 Boston's African-American community protested the showing of the racist film The Birth of a Nation. When 800 black women gathered at a Baptist church, one speaker suggested that "if there are men here who are afraid to die there are women who are not afraid. This [movie] would not be tolerated if it affected any other race or people." In spite of rallies and demonstrations, the film opened on April 17, 1915, at the Tremont Theater. While African Americans protested, thousands of white Bostonians flocked to the film. Quite possibly the most controversial movie ever produced, The Birth of a Nation also has the distinction of being the first film shown in the White House. no 0:01:00 "The Birth of a Nation" Sparks Protest: April 26, 1915 Annie Oakley Purchases Smith & Wesson Gun: April 25, 1888 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=124 On this day in 1888, Annie Oakley, the star female sharpshooter in Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show, purchased a Model 3 handgun made by the Springfield firm of Smith & Wesson. Horace Smith and Daniel B. Wesson had joined forces in the 1850s and opened a factory in Springfield to produce a revolutionary type of gun and ammunition. Their design pioneered the use of sealed cartridges for quick-loading and rapid-firing. The company continued to innovate, introducing the Model 3, which became a favorite of the U.S. cavalry, cowboys, and European soldiers; the 38 revolver, carried by policemen all over the world; and the Magnum made famous by Clint Eastwood in the movie "Dirty Harry." Sat, 25 Apr 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=124 On this day in 1888, Annie Oakley, the star female sharpshooter in Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show, purchased a Model 3 handgun made by the Springfield firm of Smith & Wesson. Horace Smith and Daniel B. Wesson had joined forces in the 1850s and opened a factory in Springfield to produce a revolutionary type of gun and ammunition. Their design pioneered the use of sealed cartridges for quick-loading and rapid-firing. The company continued to innovate, introducing the Model 3, which became a favorite of the U.S. cavalry, cowboys, and European soldiers; the 38 revolver, carried by policemen all over the world; and the Magnum made famous by Clint Eastwood in the movie "Dirty Harry." no 0:01:00 Annie Oakley Purchases Smith & Wesson Gun: April 25, 1888 Legislature Designates Day of Remembrance for Armenian Genocide : April 24, 1990 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=123 On this day in 1990, the 75th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, the Massachusetts legislature officially designated the date as a Day of Remembrance for the million and a half Armenians killed in the first genocide of the twentieth century. The Commonwealth has long been home to one of the nation's largest and most vibrant Armenian communities. The first Armenian church in America was in Worcester, but it was the smaller community of Watertown that became the center of Armenian immigrant culture. Armenians began arriving in Watertown in the late 1800s. They worked in the local Hood Rubber plant and later established businesses, churches, schools, and arts and civic organizations, including the Armenian Library and Museum of America. Fri, 24 Apr 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=123 On this day in 1990, the 75th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, the Massachusetts legislature officially designated the date as a Day of Remembrance for the million and a half Armenians killed in the first genocide of the twentieth century. The Commonwealth has long been home to one of the nation's largest and most vibrant Armenian communities. The first Armenian church in America was in Worcester, but it was the smaller community of Watertown that became the center of Armenian immigrant culture. Armenians began arriving in Watertown in the late 1800s. They worked in the local Hood Rubber plant and later established businesses, churches, schools, and arts and civic organizations, including the Armenian Library and Museum of America. no 0:01:00 Legislature Designates Day of Remembrance for Armenian Genocide : April 24, 1990 W.E.B. DuBois Returns to Harvard: April 23, 1904 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=122 On this day in 1904, W.E.B. DuBois gave a lecture on "the race question" at Harvard, where nine years before he had been the first black person to receive a Ph.D. From his childhood in Great Barrington, where he was relatively sheltered from racism, to his old age in Africa, where he moved to escape it, DuBois devoted his energies and talents to helping his fellow African Americans gain political and economic power. Founder of the NAACP, he later became more militant than most of its members. His involvement in the Pan-African Movement led him to support African independence. He moved to Ghana in his 90s and died there on August 27, 1963, the very eve of the historic civil rights march on Washington. Thu, 23 Apr 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=122 On this day in 1904, W.E.B. DuBois gave a lecture on "the race question" at Harvard, where nine years before he had been the first black person to receive a Ph.D. From his childhood in Great Barrington, where he was relatively sheltered from racism, to his old age in Africa, where he moved to escape it, DuBois devoted his energies and talents to helping his fellow African Americans gain political and economic power. Founder of the NAACP, he later became more militant than most of its members. His involvement in the Pan-African Movement led him to support African independence. He moved to Ghana in his 90s and died there on August 27, 1963, the very eve of the historic civil rights march on Washington. no 0:01:00 W.E.B. DuBois Returns to Harvard: April 23, 1904 Poet Anne Sexton Publishes First Book: April 22, 1960 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=121 On this day in 1960, Massachusetts poet Anne Sexton had her first collection of poems published, To Bedlam and Part Way Back. Just before the manuscript was to go to press, she made major changes in "Her Kind," a poem that had been rejected by literary journals, and included it in the book. From then on, she began all her readings with this poem. She formed a band called "Anne Sexton and Her Kind" to accompany her. Anne Sexton achieved great literary success, winning the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1966 but never overcame the mental illness from which she suffered all her adult life. In 1974 she committed suicide. She was 46 years old. Wed, 22 Apr 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=121 On this day in 1960, Massachusetts poet Anne Sexton had her first collection of poems published, To Bedlam and Part Way Back. Just before the manuscript was to go to press, she made major changes in "Her Kind," a poem that had been rejected by literary journals, and included it in the book. From then on, she began all her readings with this poem. She formed a band called "Anne Sexton and Her Kind" to accompany her. Anne Sexton achieved great literary success, winning the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1966 but never overcame the mental illness from which she suffered all her adult life. In 1974 she committed suicide. She was 46 years old. no 0:01:00 Poet Anne Sexton Publishes First Book: April 22, 1960 Rosie Ruiz Steals Boston Marathon: April 21, 1980 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=120 On this day in 1980 Rosie Ruiz tried to steal the Boston Marathon. Crowned the women's champion when she crossed the finish line, Ruiz looked surprisingly well-rested for someone who had just run 26 miles in record time. Jackie Gareau, whom the crowd had cheered on as the women's leader for the last half of the race, arrived at the finish line just in time to see officials bestow the traditional laurel wreath on Ruiz. Doubts surfaced immediately. In the thousands of photos and extensive film shot at the event, Ruiz appeared only in the last half-mile. After eight days of controversy, Rosie Ruiz was stripped of her title, but she maintained her innocence and refused to return her medal. Tue, 21 Apr 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=120 On this day in 1980 Rosie Ruiz tried to steal the Boston Marathon. Crowned the women's champion when she crossed the finish line, Ruiz looked surprisingly well-rested for someone who had just run 26 miles in record time. Jackie Gareau, whom the crowd had cheered on as the women's leader for the last half of the race, arrived at the finish line just in time to see officials bestow the traditional laurel wreath on Ruiz. Doubts surfaced immediately. In the thousands of photos and extensive film shot at the event, Ruiz appeared only in the last half-mile. After eight days of controversy, Rosie Ruiz was stripped of her title, but she maintained her innocence and refused to return her medal. no 0:01:00 Rosie Ruiz Steals Boston Marathon: April 21, 1980