Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Sat, 28 Mar 2015 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Concord Women Cast First Votes: March 29, 1880 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=97 On this day in 1880, Louisa May Alcott and 19 other women attended the Concord Town Meeting. The year before, the Massachusetts legislature had made it legal for women to vote in school committee elections. A strong supporter of woman suffrage, the author of Little Women was the first woman in Concord to register to vote. She rallied other women to exercise the limited franchise they had been given. When the day came, a group of 20 women, "mostly with husbands, fathers or brothers" appeared, "all in good spirits and not in the least daunted by the awful deed about to be done." When the votes were cast, she later reported, "No bolt fell on our audacious heads, no earthquake shook the town." Sun, 29 Mar 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=97 On this day in 1880, Louisa May Alcott and 19 other women attended the Concord Town Meeting. The year before, the Massachusetts legislature had made it legal for women to vote in school committee elections. A strong supporter of woman suffrage, the author of Little Women was the first woman in Concord to register to vote. She rallied other women to exercise the limited franchise they had been given. When the day came, a group of 20 women, "mostly with husbands, fathers or brothers" appeared, "all in good spirits and not in the least daunted by the awful deed about to be done." When the votes were cast, she later reported, "No bolt fell on our audacious heads, no earthquake shook the town." no 0:01:00 Concord Women Cast First Votes: March 29, 1880 Dorothea Dix Begins Her Crusade: March 28, 1841 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=96 On this day in 1841, Dorothea Dix visited an East Cambridge jail and was appalled to see mentally ill women confined alongside hardened criminals. The 40-year-old teacher and writer had been exposed to the work of English reformers, and now she embarked on a campaign to ensure humane treatment for the mentally ill in America. She began by documenting conditions in Massachusetts. With the help of several powerful men, she used her research to convince the legislature to enlarge the state mental institution in Worcester. Dix then took her crusade to other states, traveling over 30,000 miles in three years. Working largely behind the scenes, she persuaded state governments around the country to assume responsibility for their mentally ill citizens. Sat, 28 Mar 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=96 On this day in 1841, Dorothea Dix visited an East Cambridge jail and was appalled to see mentally ill women confined alongside hardened criminals. The 40-year-old teacher and writer had been exposed to the work of English reformers, and now she embarked on a campaign to ensure humane treatment for the mentally ill in America. She began by documenting conditions in Massachusetts. With the help of several powerful men, she used her research to convince the legislature to enlarge the state mental institution in Worcester. Dix then took her crusade to other states, traveling over 30,000 miles in three years. Working largely behind the scenes, she persuaded state governments around the country to assume responsibility for their mentally ill citizens. no 0:01:00 Dorothea Dix Begins Her Crusade: March 28, 1841 Jordan Marsh Announces New Store: March 27, 1947 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=95 On this day in 1947, Jordan, Marsh and Company announced that it was going to build "the greatest department store in the world" in downtown Boston. Almost a hundred years earlier, in 1851, Eben Jordan and Benjamin Marsh had gone into business together. They began by selling linen, silk, and other dry goods to wholesale customers. Ten years later, they expanded into retail sales. After the Civil War, Jordan Marsh introduced the concept of "department shopping." The store offered a wide range of goods, personal service, easy credit, art exhibitions, and musical performances. It soon became a treasured part of middle-class life in the Boston area. Many people mourned when the company was sold, and the Macy's name went up on Jordan Marsh stores. Fri, 27 Mar 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=95 On this day in 1947, Jordan, Marsh and Company announced that it was going to build "the greatest department store in the world" in downtown Boston. Almost a hundred years earlier, in 1851, Eben Jordan and Benjamin Marsh had gone into business together. They began by selling linen, silk, and other dry goods to wholesale customers. Ten years later, they expanded into retail sales. After the Civil War, Jordan Marsh introduced the concept of "department shopping." The store offered a wide range of goods, personal service, easy credit, art exhibitions, and musical performances. It soon became a treasured part of middle-class life in the Boston area. Many people mourned when the company was sold, and the Macy's name went up on Jordan Marsh stores. no 0:01:00 Jordan Marsh Announces New Store: March 27, 1947 Deborah Sampson Performs in Boston: March 26, 1802 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=94 On this day in 1802, a performance of "The American Heroine" took place in a fashionable Boston theater. The audience watched spellbound as a middle-aged farmwife, dressed in the uniform of a Continental soldier, loaded and presented arms. The woman was Deborah Sampson Gannett. In 1782, the twenty-two year old had disguised herself as a man and enlisted in a Massachusetts infantry regiment. She served for 18 months before being wounded. Her masquerade was uncovered, and she was discharged. Her story became known only when she petitioned for back pay. To make ends meet while she sought a federal pension, she took the unprecedented step of performing "The American Heroine" on stages throughout Massachusetts and New York. Thu, 26 Mar 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=94 On this day in 1802, a performance of "The American Heroine" took place in a fashionable Boston theater. The audience watched spellbound as a middle-aged farmwife, dressed in the uniform of a Continental soldier, loaded and presented arms. The woman was Deborah Sampson Gannett. In 1782, the twenty-two year old had disguised herself as a man and enlisted in a Massachusetts infantry regiment. She served for 18 months before being wounded. Her masquerade was uncovered, and she was discharged. Her story became known only when she petitioned for back pay. To make ends meet while she sought a federal pension, she took the unprecedented step of performing "The American Heroine" on stages throughout Massachusetts and New York. no 0:01:00 Deborah Sampson Performs in Boston: March 26, 1802 Legislature Guarantees Access to Public Schools: March 25, 1845 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=93 On this day in 1845, the Massachusetts legislature guaranteed that every child in the state would have access to a public school. One source of pressure on the lawmakers was a petition submitted by a group of black Nantucketers. Accustomed to the relative equality they enjoyed aboard whaling ships, the island's blacks were unwilling to accept inferior segregated schools for their children. Strong Quaker influence caused most white Nantucketers to be sympathetic to abolition, but this did not translate into support for racial equality. On the contrary, a majority of white islanders voted to prohibit school integration. The island's blacks began a boycott and petition campaign. After a bitter struggle, they succeeded in bringing about the desegregation of the island's public schools. Wed, 25 Mar 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=93 On this day in 1845, the Massachusetts legislature guaranteed that every child in the state would have access to a public school. One source of pressure on the lawmakers was a petition submitted by a group of black Nantucketers. Accustomed to the relative equality they enjoyed aboard whaling ships, the island's blacks were unwilling to accept inferior segregated schools for their children. Strong Quaker influence caused most white Nantucketers to be sympathetic to abolition, but this did not translate into support for racial equality. On the contrary, a majority of white islanders voted to prohibit school integration. The island's blacks began a boycott and petition campaign. After a bitter struggle, they succeeded in bringing about the desegregation of the island's public schools. no 0:01:00 Legislature Guarantees Access to Public Schools: March 25, 1845 Birth Control Pioneer Born: March 24, 1890 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=92 On this day in 1890, birth control pioneer John Rock was born in the small Massachusetts town of Marlborough. He was a deeply religious Catholic even as a child. After college and medical school at Harvard, he specialized in Obstetrics and Gynecology. His research into the causes of infertility produced a clearer understanding of the cycles of fertility and provided the scientific basis for an oral contraceptive. The drug he helped develop was enormously popular with women, but it generated great social and religious controversy. John Rock never succeeded in persuading the Vatican that the Pill was a "natural" form of birth control. Devastated, he withdrew from the church that he loved so much. Tue, 24 Mar 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=92 On this day in 1890, birth control pioneer John Rock was born in the small Massachusetts town of Marlborough. He was a deeply religious Catholic even as a child. After college and medical school at Harvard, he specialized in Obstetrics and Gynecology. His research into the causes of infertility produced a clearer understanding of the cycles of fertility and provided the scientific basis for an oral contraceptive. The drug he helped develop was enormously popular with women, but it generated great social and religious controversy. John Rock never succeeded in persuading the Vatican that the Pill was a "natural" form of birth control. Devastated, he withdrew from the church that he loved so much. no 0:01:00 Birth Control Pioneer Born: March 24, 1890 Kerouac Writes First Novel: March 23, 1948 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=91 On this day in 1948, Lowell native Jack Kerouac happily noted in his diary that he had written 2500 words. If he could keep up this pace, he would finish his first novel in a matter of weeks. The highly autobiographical The Town and the City was published in 1950, the same year he began writing On the Road, the novel that earned him the title "Father of the Beat Generation." By the time he died at the age of 47 Jack Kerouac had published 14 books. On the Road is Kerouac's most-read work today; it is widely considered one of the most important and influential American novels of the twentieth century, and Jack Kerouac is celebrated as one of Lowell's favorite sons. Mon, 23 Mar 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=91 On this day in 1948, Lowell native Jack Kerouac happily noted in his diary that he had written 2500 words. If he could keep up this pace, he would finish his first novel in a matter of weeks. The highly autobiographical The Town and the City was published in 1950, the same year he began writing On the Road, the novel that earned him the title "Father of the Beat Generation." By the time he died at the age of 47 Jack Kerouac had published 14 books. On the Road is Kerouac's most-read work today; it is widely considered one of the most important and influential American novels of the twentieth century, and Jack Kerouac is celebrated as one of Lowell's favorite sons. no 0:01:00 Kerouac Writes First Novel: March 23, 1948