Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Sun, 01 Feb 2015 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Father of Psychology Born: February 1, 1844 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=39 On this day in 1844 G. Stanley Hall was born in Ashfield. This farm boy from western Massachusetts would become the father of psychology in America. His career was marked by many firsts. In 1878 Harvard awarded him the nation's first Ph.D. in psychology. At Johns Hopkins University, he held the first professorship in the field and opened the first laboratory of psychological research. He trained many of the first generation of psychology professors and served as the first president of Clark University in Worcester. Among his many accomplishments during 30 years at Clark was bringing Sigmund Freud to the campus. In 1909, the founder of psychoanalysis delivered the only lectures he would ever give to an American audience. Sun, 01 Feb 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=39 On this day in 1844 G. Stanley Hall was born in Ashfield. This farm boy from western Massachusetts would become the father of psychology in America. His career was marked by many firsts. In 1878 Harvard awarded him the nation's first Ph.D. in psychology. At Johns Hopkins University, he held the first professorship in the field and opened the first laboratory of psychological research. He trained many of the first generation of psychology professors and served as the first president of Clark University in Worcester. Among his many accomplishments during 30 years at Clark was bringing Sigmund Freud to the campus. In 1909, the founder of psychoanalysis delivered the only lectures he would ever give to an American audience. no 0:01:00 Father of Psychology Born: February 1, 1844 Native American Writer Born : January 31, 1798 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=36 On this day in 1798, a Pequot Indian named William Apess was born in Colrain, a village in western Massachusetts. Although his childhood was marked by poverty and abuse, he did learn to read and write. After converting to Christianity, he became a traveling preacher. He sought to convert other Indians to Christianity and wanted white people to recognize Indians as equal members of the family of God. In his 30s, he moved to Cape Cod, where he helped the Mashpee Indians regain a measure of self-government. William Apess published five books, including an autobiography. In 1837, he disappeared from the historical record. Like most native people of the time, he became invisible. Fortunately, his published words survive. Sat, 31 Jan 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=36 On this day in 1798, a Pequot Indian named William Apess was born in Colrain, a village in western Massachusetts. Although his childhood was marked by poverty and abuse, he did learn to read and write. After converting to Christianity, he became a traveling preacher. He sought to convert other Indians to Christianity and wanted white people to recognize Indians as equal members of the family of God. In his 30s, he moved to Cape Cod, where he helped the Mashpee Indians regain a measure of self-government. William Apess published five books, including an autobiography. In 1837, he disappeared from the historical record. Like most native people of the time, he became invisible. Fortunately, his published words survive. no 0:01:00 Native American Writer Born : January 31, 1798 First African American Graduate of Harvard Born: January 30, 1844 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=35 On this day in 1844, Richard Greener, the first African-American graduate of Harvard, was born. His unusual education was made possible by several wealthy Bostonians, who saw potential in the young man working as a night watchman. With their financial support, he completed college preparatory courses and entered Harvard. After graduating with honors in 1870, he began a successful academic career. He later distinguished himself as a lawyer and foreign service officer. He returned from overseas just as the movement for black empowerment was splitting into two factions. He backed the more conservative faction, headed by his old friend Booker T. Washington, and spied on the other. When his duplicity was discovered, he lost the trust of both groups. Fri, 30 Jan 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=35 On this day in 1844, Richard Greener, the first African-American graduate of Harvard, was born. His unusual education was made possible by several wealthy Bostonians, who saw potential in the young man working as a night watchman. With their financial support, he completed college preparatory courses and entered Harvard. After graduating with honors in 1870, he began a successful academic career. He later distinguished himself as a lawyer and foreign service officer. He returned from overseas just as the movement for black empowerment was splitting into two factions. He backed the more conservative faction, headed by his old friend Booker T. Washington, and spied on the other. When his duplicity was discovered, he lost the trust of both groups. no 0:01:00 First African American Graduate of Harvard Born: January 30, 1844 Robert Frost Dies: January 29, 1963 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=34 On this day in 1963, Robert Frost died, the most popular and renowned American poet of the twentieth century. But his success was a long time in coming. It was as a student at Lawrence High School that he discovered he had a gift and a passion for poetry. His first published poem appeared in the school newspaper in 1890. It was another four years before he sold his first -- entirely forgettable -- poem to a New York newspaper. Almost two decades of failure followed. Only after a three-year stay in England, did Frost finally find his poetic voice and become the man who won four Pulitzer Prizes and received so many honorary degrees that he had his academic hoods made into a quilt. Thu, 29 Jan 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=34 On this day in 1963, Robert Frost died, the most popular and renowned American poet of the twentieth century. But his success was a long time in coming. It was as a student at Lawrence High School that he discovered he had a gift and a passion for poetry. His first published poem appeared in the school newspaper in 1890. It was another four years before he sold his first -- entirely forgettable -- poem to a New York newspaper. Almost two decades of failure followed. Only after a three-year stay in England, did Frost finally find his poetic voice and become the man who won four Pulitzer Prizes and received so many honorary degrees that he had his academic hoods made into a quilt. no 0:01:00 Robert Frost Dies: January 29, 1963 Julia Ward Howe Elected to American Academy of Arts: January 28, 1908 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=33 On this day in 1908, 89-year-old Julia Ward Howe became the first woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Howe lived most of her long life in Boston, but it was in the nation's capital that she wrote the poem for which she is remembered today. After an outing to see the Union Army massed outside of Washington, she was inspired to write new words for an old folk tune. The result, published in the Atlantic Monthly magazine in 1862, was "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." The song was instantly popular and won Howe admirers throughout the North. After the war, she devoted the next half-century to the cause that was closest to her heart: equality for women. Wed, 28 Jan 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=33 On this day in 1908, 89-year-old Julia Ward Howe became the first woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Howe lived most of her long life in Boston, but it was in the nation's capital that she wrote the poem for which she is remembered today. After an outing to see the Union Army massed outside of Washington, she was inspired to write new words for an old folk tune. The result, published in the Atlantic Monthly magazine in 1862, was "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." The song was instantly popular and won Howe admirers throughout the North. After the war, she devoted the next half-century to the cause that was closest to her heart: equality for women. no 0:01:00 Julia Ward Howe Elected to American Academy of Arts: January 28, 1908 Bill Belichick Named Head Coach of the Patriots: January 27, 2000 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=32 On this day in 2000, Bill Belichick was named head coach of the New England Patriots. Belichick had already earned a reputation as a brilliant defensive strategist in his years with the Giants and the Jets. In his second season with the Patriots, Belichick made a controversial move, replacing starting quarterback Drew Bledsoe with the unknown backup, Tom Brady. Belichick's "one-die-all-die" philosophy, which emphasizes teamwork over individual star players, helped the team win a series of come-from-behind playoff games. Perhaps the most thrilling was the last game ever played in Foxboro Stadium when the Patriots scored a field goal in overtime to beat the Oakland Raiders. The team continued its exciting play, winning three out of the next four Super Bowl games. Tue, 27 Jan 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=32 On this day in 2000, Bill Belichick was named head coach of the New England Patriots. Belichick had already earned a reputation as a brilliant defensive strategist in his years with the Giants and the Jets. In his second season with the Patriots, Belichick made a controversial move, replacing starting quarterback Drew Bledsoe with the unknown backup, Tom Brady. Belichick's "one-die-all-die" philosophy, which emphasizes teamwork over individual star players, helped the team win a series of come-from-behind playoff games. Perhaps the most thrilling was the last game ever played in Foxboro Stadium when the Patriots scored a field goal in overtime to beat the Oakland Raiders. The team continued its exciting play, winning three out of the next four Super Bowl games. no 0:01:00 Bill Belichick Named Head Coach of the Patriots: January 27, 2000 Lowell Women Sign On to Teach in the West: January 26, 1864 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=31 On this day in 1864, a visitor from Seattle held a meeting in Lowell. Asa Mercer explained to his largely female audience that there was a great scarcity of teachers in the Washington Territory. Jobs -- and single men -- were plentiful. Both were in short supply in Massachusetts. Any woman who could raise the money for her passage would readily find a teaching position -- and soon a husband. Mercer also appealed to the women's sense of duty: "their presence and influence were so much needed" in the West, he told them. In spite of the opportunities Seattle offered, it was unimaginably far away. Only 11 women chose to accompany Mercer on his journey home. These brave teacher-pioneers were long known as the "Mercer Girls." Mon, 26 Jan 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=31 On this day in 1864, a visitor from Seattle held a meeting in Lowell. Asa Mercer explained to his largely female audience that there was a great scarcity of teachers in the Washington Territory. Jobs -- and single men -- were plentiful. Both were in short supply in Massachusetts. Any woman who could raise the money for her passage would readily find a teaching position -- and soon a husband. Mercer also appealed to the women's sense of duty: "their presence and influence were so much needed" in the West, he told them. In spite of the opportunities Seattle offered, it was unimaginably far away. Only 11 women chose to accompany Mercer on his journey home. These brave teacher-pioneers were long known as the "Mercer Girls." no 0:01:00 Lowell Women Sign On to Teach in the West: January 26, 1864