Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Sat, 06 Feb 2016 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Activist Florence Luscomb Born: February 6, 1887 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=44 On this day in 1887, lifelong political activist Florence Luscomb was born in Lowell. As a child, she heard the legendary Susan B. Anthony speak. In her 20s, she traveled the state campaigning for woman suffrage. In her 30s, she ran for public office, coming within 1% point of winning a seat on the Boston City Council. In her 60s, she was the Progressive Party's nominee for Governor. She remained an activist well into her 80s. In the last decades of her long life, she was a living bridge between the first and second waves of American feminism. A bust of Luscomb is included in a work of art installed in the State House to honor the contributions of women to public life in Massachusetts. Sat, 06 Feb 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=44 On this day in 1887, lifelong political activist Florence Luscomb was born in Lowell. As a child, she heard the legendary Susan B. Anthony speak. In her 20s, she traveled the state campaigning for woman suffrage. In her 30s, she ran for public office, coming within 1% point of winning a seat on the Boston City Council. In her 60s, she was the Progressive Party's nominee for Governor. She remained an activist well into her 80s. In the last decades of her long life, she was a living bridge between the first and second waves of American feminism. A bust of Luscomb is included in a work of art installed in the State House to honor the contributions of women to public life in Massachusetts. no 0:01:00 Activist Florence Luscomb Born: February 6, 1887 Jonathan Edwards Ordained: February 5, 1727 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=43 On this day in 1727, Jonathan Edwards was ordained in Northampton. Two years later, he succeeded his grandfather as minister of what was then the largest and most influential church outside of Boston. He was young -- only 23 -- but he was already a brilliant thinker and charismatic preacher. Alarmed by the lax religious practices and spiritual complacency of his parishioners, he began preaching on the terrifying consequences of sin. His fire and brimstone sermons created a state of religious panic and produced conversions by the hundreds. The revival he inspired spread from Northampton to every corner of the colonies. During the height of the Great Awakening, as the movement was called, Jonathan Edwards was the most powerful man in British North America. Fri, 05 Feb 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=43 On this day in 1727, Jonathan Edwards was ordained in Northampton. Two years later, he succeeded his grandfather as minister of what was then the largest and most influential church outside of Boston. He was young -- only 23 -- but he was already a brilliant thinker and charismatic preacher. Alarmed by the lax religious practices and spiritual complacency of his parishioners, he began preaching on the terrifying consequences of sin. His fire and brimstone sermons created a state of religious panic and produced conversions by the hundreds. The revival he inspired spread from Northampton to every corner of the colonies. During the height of the Great Awakening, as the movement was called, Jonathan Edwards was the most powerful man in British North America. no 0:01:00 Jonathan Edwards Ordained: February 5, 1727 Boston Celtics Retire Larry Bird's Number: February 4, 1993 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=42 On this day in 1993, there was standing room only in the Boston Garden as the Celtics retired Larry Bird's number. In his 13 seasons with Boston, Bird emerged as the embodiment of "Celtics Pride." He joined the team in 1980 and was the NBA Rookie of the Year. With Robert Parish and Kevin McHale, he led the Celtics to ten Atlantic Division Crowns and three NBA titles. The league's MVP three seasons in a row, he still holds the all-time Celtics record for free-throws. Bird's shooting prowess and brilliant defense drew crowds across the country, and helped rekindle enthusiasm for professional basketball. In 1996, he was named one of the 50 greatest players in NBA history. Thu, 04 Feb 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=42 On this day in 1993, there was standing room only in the Boston Garden as the Celtics retired Larry Bird's number. In his 13 seasons with Boston, Bird emerged as the embodiment of "Celtics Pride." He joined the team in 1980 and was the NBA Rookie of the Year. With Robert Parish and Kevin McHale, he led the Celtics to ten Atlantic Division Crowns and three NBA titles. The league's MVP three seasons in a row, he still holds the all-time Celtics record for free-throws. Bird's shooting prowess and brilliant defense drew crowds across the country, and helped rekindle enthusiasm for professional basketball. In 1996, he was named one of the 50 greatest players in NBA history. no 0:01:00 Boston Celtics Retire Larry Bird's Number: February 4, 1993 Tenley Albright Wins Olympic Gold: February 3, 1956 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=41 On this day in 1956, figure skater Tenley Albright won the Gold Medal at the Olympic Games in Cortina, Italy. This should not have been a surprise but it was. The 20-year-old from Newton was the clear favorite until she injured herself only two weeks before the games. Few people thought she would be able to compete, but she did. She skated flawlessly and became the first American figure skater to win gold. Tenley Albright had defied the odds before. Stricken with polio at age 11, she had skated her way to recovery. Her determination made her a great skater and, after her retirement from competition, helped her realize her other life ambition. She became a respected surgeon and medical researcher. Wed, 03 Feb 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=41 On this day in 1956, figure skater Tenley Albright won the Gold Medal at the Olympic Games in Cortina, Italy. This should not have been a surprise but it was. The 20-year-old from Newton was the clear favorite until she injured herself only two weeks before the games. Few people thought she would be able to compete, but she did. She skated flawlessly and became the first American figure skater to win gold. Tenley Albright had defied the odds before. Stricken with polio at age 11, she had skated her way to recovery. Her determination made her a great skater and, after her retirement from competition, helped her realize her other life ambition. She became a respected surgeon and medical researcher. no 0:01:00 Tenley Albright Wins Olympic Gold: February 3, 1956 Abigail Adams Knows : February 2, 1775 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=40 On this day in 1775, Abigail Adams wrote sadly "the Die is Cast . . . The Sword is now our only yet dreadful alternative." The day before, news had come from England. King George had rejected the colonists' pleas that he overturn the harsh measures imposed on them by Parliament. The King promised to "withstand every attempt to weaken" Parliament. Abigail Adams was astute enough to know that this was the beginning of the end. She confided in a letter to a friend, "We know too well the blessings of freedom to tamely resign it." Within a few months, Minutemen and British Redcoats would engage each other on the Old North Bridge in Concord. There was no turning back. Tue, 02 Feb 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=40 On this day in 1775, Abigail Adams wrote sadly "the Die is Cast . . . The Sword is now our only yet dreadful alternative." The day before, news had come from England. King George had rejected the colonists' pleas that he overturn the harsh measures imposed on them by Parliament. The King promised to "withstand every attempt to weaken" Parliament. Abigail Adams was astute enough to know that this was the beginning of the end. She confided in a letter to a friend, "We know too well the blessings of freedom to tamely resign it." Within a few months, Minutemen and British Redcoats would engage each other on the Old North Bridge in Concord. There was no turning back. no 0:01:00 Abigail Adams Knows : February 2, 1775 Father of Psychology Born: February 1, 1844 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=39 On this day in 1844 G. Stanley Hall was born in Ashfield. This farm boy from western Massachusetts would become the father of psychology in America. His career was marked by many firsts. In 1878 Harvard awarded him the nation's first Ph.D. in psychology. At Johns Hopkins University, he held the first professorship in the field and opened the first laboratory of psychological research. He trained many of the first generation of psychology professors and served as the first president of Clark University in Worcester. Among his many accomplishments during 30 years at Clark was bringing Sigmund Freud to the campus. In 1909, the founder of psychoanalysis delivered the only lectures he would ever give to an American audience. Mon, 01 Feb 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=39 On this day in 1844 G. Stanley Hall was born in Ashfield. This farm boy from western Massachusetts would become the father of psychology in America. His career was marked by many firsts. In 1878 Harvard awarded him the nation's first Ph.D. in psychology. At Johns Hopkins University, he held the first professorship in the field and opened the first laboratory of psychological research. He trained many of the first generation of psychology professors and served as the first president of Clark University in Worcester. Among his many accomplishments during 30 years at Clark was bringing Sigmund Freud to the campus. In 1909, the founder of psychoanalysis delivered the only lectures he would ever give to an American audience. no 0:01:00 Father of Psychology Born: February 1, 1844 Native American Writer Born : January 31, 1798 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=36 On this day in 1798, a Pequot Indian named William Apess was born in Colrain, a village in western Massachusetts. Although his childhood was marked by poverty and abuse, he did learn to read and write. After converting to Christianity, he became a traveling preacher. He sought to convert other Indians to Christianity and wanted white people to recognize Indians as equal members of the family of God. In his 30s, he moved to Cape Cod, where he helped the Mashpee Indians regain a measure of self-government. William Apess published five books, including an autobiography. In 1837, he disappeared from the historical record. Like most native people of the time, he became invisible. Fortunately, his published words survive. Sun, 31 Jan 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=36 On this day in 1798, a Pequot Indian named William Apess was born in Colrain, a village in western Massachusetts. Although his childhood was marked by poverty and abuse, he did learn to read and write. After converting to Christianity, he became a traveling preacher. He sought to convert other Indians to Christianity and wanted white people to recognize Indians as equal members of the family of God. In his 30s, he moved to Cape Cod, where he helped the Mashpee Indians regain a measure of self-government. William Apess published five books, including an autobiography. In 1837, he disappeared from the historical record. Like most native people of the time, he became invisible. Fortunately, his published words survive. no 0:01:00 Native American Writer Born : January 31, 1798