Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Fri, 31 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Washington Ends Visit to Massachusetts: October 31, 1789 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=314 On this day in 1789, George Washington concluded a ten-day presidential visit to Massachusetts. Adoring crowds of grateful citizens greeted him everywhere. People preserved the dishes he used, the chairs he sat on, and the beds he slept in. Many of the streets he traveled down were renamed "Washington Street." Only Governor John Hancock slighted the president, insisting that, since he was head of the Commonwealth, Washington should come to visit him. Hancock soon saw the error of his ways. The day after the president's arrival in Boston, Hancock belatedly paid his respects. His legs covered in bandages, he claimed an excruciating attack of gout had prevented him from welcoming the president. In the interest of promoting unity, Washington accepted the explanation with characteristic grace. Fri, 31 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=314 On this day in 1789, George Washington concluded a ten-day presidential visit to Massachusetts. Adoring crowds of grateful citizens greeted him everywhere. People preserved the dishes he used, the chairs he sat on, and the beds he slept in. Many of the streets he traveled down were renamed "Washington Street." Only Governor John Hancock slighted the president, insisting that, since he was head of the Commonwealth, Washington should come to visit him. Hancock soon saw the error of his ways. The day after the president's arrival in Boston, Hancock belatedly paid his respects. His legs covered in bandages, he claimed an excruciating attack of gout had prevented him from welcoming the president. In the interest of promoting unity, Washington accepted the explanation with characteristic grace. no 0:01:00 Washington Ends Visit to Massachusetts: October 31, 1789 Underwater Explorer Proves Wreck is Whydah: October 30, 1985 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=313 On this day in 1985, treasure hunter Barry Clifford finally had proof that the wreck he was salvaging off Cape Cod was indeed the pirate ship Whydah. Lost in a violent storm off Wellfleet in 1717, the Whydah had gone to the bottom within sight of shore. Tales of the treasure that sank with the ship filled Clifford's childhood. His dream of finding the wreck became an obsession. When divers began to bring up pieces of eight and gold from the right time period, he was convinced they came from the legendary ship. But only when the words "The Whydah Gally 1716" appeared beneath the encrusted surface of a bell did Barry Clifford know for sure that he had indeed found the Whydah. Thu, 30 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=313 On this day in 1985, treasure hunter Barry Clifford finally had proof that the wreck he was salvaging off Cape Cod was indeed the pirate ship Whydah. Lost in a violent storm off Wellfleet in 1717, the Whydah had gone to the bottom within sight of shore. Tales of the treasure that sank with the ship filled Clifford's childhood. His dream of finding the wreck became an obsession. When divers began to bring up pieces of eight and gold from the right time period, he was convinced they came from the legendary ship. But only when the words "The Whydah Gally 1716" appeared beneath the encrusted surface of a bell did Barry Clifford know for sure that he had indeed found the Whydah. no 0:01:00 Underwater Explorer Proves Wreck is Whydah: October 30, 1985 Stock Market Crash Heralds Great Depression: October 29, 1929 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=312 On this day in 1929, stock markets in Boston, New York, and other major American cities tumbled so dramatically that the day was named Black Tuesday. Capping five days of frenzied panic selling, Black Tuesday marked the beginning of the nation's -- and the state's -- slide into the Great Depression. By 1934, Massachusetts cities that had once been prosperous centers of textile, shoe, and garment manufacturing were places of desperation. Unemployed workers wandered barefoot outside of shoe factories that had failed. Soup kitchens and bread lines offered food to the starving, but at a high cost to their self-esteem. A Washington relief worker wrote to her boss that "the picture is so grim that whatever words I use will seem hysterical and exaggerated." Wed, 29 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=312 On this day in 1929, stock markets in Boston, New York, and other major American cities tumbled so dramatically that the day was named Black Tuesday. Capping five days of frenzied panic selling, Black Tuesday marked the beginning of the nation's -- and the state's -- slide into the Great Depression. By 1934, Massachusetts cities that had once been prosperous centers of textile, shoe, and garment manufacturing were places of desperation. Unemployed workers wandered barefoot outside of shoe factories that had failed. Soup kitchens and bread lines offered food to the starving, but at a high cost to their self-esteem. A Washington relief worker wrote to her boss that "the picture is so grim that whatever words I use will seem hysterical and exaggerated." no 0:01:00 Stock Market Crash Heralds Great Depression: October 29, 1929 Revolutionary War Commander Artemas Ward Dies: October 28, 1800 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=311 On this day in 1800, the man who commanded the ragtag American force that chased the British Regulars back to Boston following the battles of Lexington and Concord died at home in Shrewsbury. Trusted and admired by the volunteer militiamen who made up the first American army, General Artemas Ward was severely criticized by George Washington, who assumed command of the Continental Army in July 1775. Accustomed to serving with professional officers, Washington and his fellow Virginians dismissed Ward as "a fat old church warden." Washington was also appalled by the lax discipline among Ward's New England soldiers. After two years, Artemas Ward resigned and returned home to Shrewsbury. The Massachusetts general faded from national memory and from the history books. Tue, 28 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=311 On this day in 1800, the man who commanded the ragtag American force that chased the British Regulars back to Boston following the battles of Lexington and Concord died at home in Shrewsbury. Trusted and admired by the volunteer militiamen who made up the first American army, General Artemas Ward was severely criticized by George Washington, who assumed command of the Continental Army in July 1775. Accustomed to serving with professional officers, Washington and his fellow Virginians dismissed Ward as "a fat old church warden." Washington was also appalled by the lax discipline among Ward's New England soldiers. After two years, Artemas Ward resigned and returned home to Shrewsbury. The Massachusetts general faded from national memory and from the history books. no 0:01:00 Revolutionary War Commander Artemas Ward Dies: October 28, 1800 Red Sox Win World Series: October 27, 2004 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=310 On this day in 2004, the Boston Red Sox ended an 86-year drought and buried the "Curse of the Bambino." They won the World Series! Their sweep of the St. Louis Cardinals was almost -- but not quite -- anti-climactic. The pivotal battle had taken place in the American League championship against their nemesis, the New York Yankees. Down three games to none, and facing elimination, again, Boston did what no team had ever done before in baseball history. They came back to win the series 4–3. Then they took on and dispensed with the Cardinals. Jubilant Red Sox fans around the world celebrated. Three days later, an estimated 3,000,000 of them lined the parade route in Boston and cheered themselves hoarse as the victorious team passed by. Mon, 27 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=310 On this day in 2004, the Boston Red Sox ended an 86-year drought and buried the "Curse of the Bambino." They won the World Series! Their sweep of the St. Louis Cardinals was almost -- but not quite -- anti-climactic. The pivotal battle had taken place in the American League championship against their nemesis, the New York Yankees. Down three games to none, and facing elimination, again, Boston did what no team had ever done before in baseball history. They came back to win the series 4–3. Then they took on and dispensed with the Cardinals. Jubilant Red Sox fans around the world celebrated. Three days later, an estimated 3,000,000 of them lined the parade route in Boston and cheered themselves hoarse as the victorious team passed by. no 0:01:00 Red Sox Win World Series: October 27, 2004 Senator Edward Brooke Born: October 26, 1919 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=309 On this day in 1919, Edward Brooke, III, the only African-American to represent Massachusetts in the U.S. Congress, was born. A decorated veteran, he graduated from the BU School of Law in 1948 and began practicing in Roxbury. In 1966, after serving as the nation's first African-American state Attorney General, Brooke achieved another first: He became the first black person ever elected to the U. S. Senate by popular vote. In his two terms in Congress, he worked for civil rights, fair housing, consumer protection, and arms limitation. When the Watergate scandal broke, he was the first senator to call on President Richard Nixon to resign. In 2000 the state recognized his accomplishments by naming a new Boston courthouse in his honor. Sun, 26 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=309 On this day in 1919, Edward Brooke, III, the only African-American to represent Massachusetts in the U.S. Congress, was born. A decorated veteran, he graduated from the BU School of Law in 1948 and began practicing in Roxbury. In 1966, after serving as the nation's first African-American state Attorney General, Brooke achieved another first: He became the first black person ever elected to the U. S. Senate by popular vote. In his two terms in Congress, he worked for civil rights, fair housing, consumer protection, and arms limitation. When the Watergate scandal broke, he was the first senator to call on President Richard Nixon to resign. In 2000 the state recognized his accomplishments by naming a new Boston courthouse in his honor. no 0:01:00 Senator Edward Brooke Born: October 26, 1919 Boston Celebrates Opening of Aqueduct: October 25, 1848 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=308 On this day in 1848, 300,000 people from all over New England gathered on Boston Common. They came to celebrate the completion of the city's first municipal water system. With the construction of an aqueduct that brought fresh water 15 miles from Lake Cochituate in Natick to Boston, the city for the first time had a pure supply of water for drinking, bathing, cooking, and cleaning. As the sun set, the gates to the fountain in Frog Pond were opened and a stream of clean water shot 80 feet in the air. People cheered and wept with joy. The celebration continued the next day, when the mayor announced that schools would close so that the city's children could play in the Frog Pond fountain. Sat, 25 Oct 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=308 On this day in 1848, 300,000 people from all over New England gathered on Boston Common. They came to celebrate the completion of the city's first municipal water system. With the construction of an aqueduct that brought fresh water 15 miles from Lake Cochituate in Natick to Boston, the city for the first time had a pure supply of water for drinking, bathing, cooking, and cleaning. As the sun set, the gates to the fountain in Frog Pond were opened and a stream of clean water shot 80 feet in the air. People cheered and wept with joy. The celebration continued the next day, when the mayor announced that schools would close so that the city's children could play in the Frog Pond fountain. no 0:01:00 Boston Celebrates Opening of Aqueduct: October 25, 1848