Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Fri, 09 Dec 2016 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Loyalist Despairs at British Defeat: December 9, 1781 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=353 On this day in 1781, Loyalist lawyer Ward Chipman of Boston wrote despairingly to his friend Jonathan Sewall who had gone into exile in London. Chipman confessed, "the mortification of seeing our Enemies . . . triumphant in such a cause is too much for my Spirits." Chipman, Sewall, and many others in Massachusetts did not support the war for independence. Some abandoned estates and fortunes and "quit America" when war broke out, seeking to escape, as Sewall said, "bombs, great guns, . . . battles, sieges, murder, plague, . . . famine, rebellion, and the Devil." They expected to return when the British troops had suppressed the rebellion. The Sewalls spent 12 years in England before moving to Canada in 1787. Fri, 09 Dec 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=353 On this day in 1781, Loyalist lawyer Ward Chipman of Boston wrote despairingly to his friend Jonathan Sewall who had gone into exile in London. Chipman confessed, "the mortification of seeing our Enemies . . . triumphant in such a cause is too much for my Spirits." Chipman, Sewall, and many others in Massachusetts did not support the war for independence. Some abandoned estates and fortunes and "quit America" when war broke out, seeking to escape, as Sewall said, "bombs, great guns, . . . battles, sieges, murder, plague, . . . famine, rebellion, and the Devil." They expected to return when the British troops had suppressed the rebellion. The Sewalls spent 12 years in England before moving to Canada in 1787. no 0:01:00 Loyalist Despairs at British Defeat: December 9, 1781 Crowd Gathers to Hear Writer Mary Antin: December 8, 1912 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=352 On this day in 1912, over 1,000 people gathered at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York to hear Boston writer Mary Antin. She had come to make a plea for more aid to support Jewish immigrant girls arriving alone in the United States. Antin had recently published The Promised Land, a memoir of her emigration from Russia to Boston's South End. She believed that the strength of her story lay in the fact that it illustrated "scores of unwritten lives." Attention from the book brought Mary Antin into social and professional circles that included Theodore Roosevelt and other prominent Americans. She became a vocal and energetic presence in public conversations about the most critical issues of the early twentieth century, including immigration, education, and Zionism. Thu, 08 Dec 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=352 On this day in 1912, over 1,000 people gathered at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York to hear Boston writer Mary Antin. She had come to make a plea for more aid to support Jewish immigrant girls arriving alone in the United States. Antin had recently published The Promised Land, a memoir of her emigration from Russia to Boston's South End. She believed that the strength of her story lay in the fact that it illustrated "scores of unwritten lives." Attention from the book brought Mary Antin into social and professional circles that included Theodore Roosevelt and other prominent Americans. She became a vocal and energetic presence in public conversations about the most critical issues of the early twentieth century, including immigration, education, and Zionism. no 0:01:00 Crowd Gathers to Hear Writer Mary Antin: December 8, 1912 WW II Sends Record Number of Bay State Women to Work: December 7, 1941 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=351 On this day in 1941, the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor launched the people of Massachusetts into World War II -- and out of the Depression. The state's industrial cities and shipyards sprang back to life to meet wartime demand for munitions, ships, and military supplies. But with men leaving to enlist, there was a sudden labor shortage; women stepped forward as "production soldiers," taking their place on assembly lines. In the mill town of Lowell, where women had traditionally worked unskilled jobs for low wages, new opportunities opened, offering independence, self-respect, and money. At the end of the war, many women lost their jobs to returning soldiers, but others, armed with new skills, remained. The number of working women never again fell to pre-war levels. Wed, 07 Dec 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=351 On this day in 1941, the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor launched the people of Massachusetts into World War II -- and out of the Depression. The state's industrial cities and shipyards sprang back to life to meet wartime demand for munitions, ships, and military supplies. But with men leaving to enlist, there was a sudden labor shortage; women stepped forward as "production soldiers," taking their place on assembly lines. In the mill town of Lowell, where women had traditionally worked unskilled jobs for low wages, new opportunities opened, offering independence, self-respect, and money. At the end of the war, many women lost their jobs to returning soldiers, but others, armed with new skills, remained. The number of working women never again fell to pre-war levels. no 0:01:00 WW II Sends Record Number of Bay State Women to Work: December 7, 1941 Erastus Bigelow Dies: December 6, 1879 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=350 On this day in 1879, Erastus Bigelow, the father of the modern carpet industry, died in Boston. Born in West Boylston, Bigelow and his brother followed their father into the textile business. After several inventions that mechanized production of suspender webbing and piping cord, Bigelow revolutionized the carpet-making industry with his invention of an automatic carpet loom in 1841. His Bigelow Carpet Company factory in Clinton produced various types of carpets much more cheaply than was possible with the use of hand looms, making carpets available to the middle class. Throughout his lifetime, Bigelow patented at least 35 looms. His interest in technology extended to educating future generations: he was one of the founders of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1861. Tue, 06 Dec 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=350 On this day in 1879, Erastus Bigelow, the father of the modern carpet industry, died in Boston. Born in West Boylston, Bigelow and his brother followed their father into the textile business. After several inventions that mechanized production of suspender webbing and piping cord, Bigelow revolutionized the carpet-making industry with his invention of an automatic carpet loom in 1841. His Bigelow Carpet Company factory in Clinton produced various types of carpets much more cheaply than was possible with the use of hand looms, making carpets available to the middle class. Throughout his lifetime, Bigelow patented at least 35 looms. His interest in technology extended to educating future generations: he was one of the founders of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1861. no 0:01:00 Erastus Bigelow Dies: December 6, 1879 "Good Will Hunting" Released: December 5, 1997 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=349 On this day in 1997, Miramax released "Good Will Hunting," a movie about the collision of two Boston-area cultures: the heady, prestigious world of Cambridge academia and the proud but gritty working-class brotherhood of South Boston. Local boys Matt Damon and Ben Affleck had written the screenplay to create leading roles for themselves; with the movie's smash-hit success they became Hollywood's newest stars. The screenplay was first picked up by another studio, but when Affleck and Damon learned that it would not be filmed in Boston, they canceled the deal. Miramax recognized that the Boston setting was essential to the story and agreed to film on site. "Good Will Hunting" is one in a long line of movie hits in which Massachusetts has played a role. Mon, 05 Dec 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=349 On this day in 1997, Miramax released "Good Will Hunting," a movie about the collision of two Boston-area cultures: the heady, prestigious world of Cambridge academia and the proud but gritty working-class brotherhood of South Boston. Local boys Matt Damon and Ben Affleck had written the screenplay to create leading roles for themselves; with the movie's smash-hit success they became Hollywood's newest stars. The screenplay was first picked up by another studio, but when Affleck and Damon learned that it would not be filmed in Boston, they canceled the deal. Miramax recognized that the Boston setting was essential to the story and agreed to film on site. "Good Will Hunting" is one in a long line of movie hits in which Massachusetts has played a role. no 0:01:00 "Good Will Hunting" Released: December 5, 1997 African Meeting House Opens: December 4, 1806 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=348 On this day in 1806, the Reverend Thomas Paul was installed as pastor of the new African Meeting House in Boston. Two days later, the church was officially dedicated. The Meeting House served as a spiritual, social, and physical haven for the black community of Boston, many of whom lived on the northern slope of Beacon Hill. Members gathered at the Meeting House to worship but also to plan political action. Black children attended school there. It was the setting for musical concerts, dramatic productions, debates, lectures, and more. In 1972 the Museum of African American History acquired the Meeting House and has since restored it to its 1854 design. It is the oldest extant black church building in the United States. Sun, 04 Dec 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=348 On this day in 1806, the Reverend Thomas Paul was installed as pastor of the new African Meeting House in Boston. Two days later, the church was officially dedicated. The Meeting House served as a spiritual, social, and physical haven for the black community of Boston, many of whom lived on the northern slope of Beacon Hill. Members gathered at the Meeting House to worship but also to plan political action. Black children attended school there. It was the setting for musical concerts, dramatic productions, debates, lectures, and more. In 1972 the Museum of African American History acquired the Meeting House and has since restored it to its 1854 design. It is the oldest extant black church building in the United States. no 0:01:00 African Meeting House Opens: December 4, 1806 Quakers Outlawed in Plymouth: December 3, 1658 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=347 On this day in 1658, Plymouth Court ordered that any boat carrying Quakers to Sandwich be seized to prevent the religious heretics from landing. A year earlier, Quakers in Sandwich had established the first Friends' Meeting in the New World. Magistrates in both Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay colonies were alarmed by Quaker teachings that individuals could receive direct personal revelations from God. To protect orthodox Puritanism, the courts passed a series of laws forbidding residents from housing Quakers. Quakers themselves were threatened with whipping, arrest, imprisonment, banishment, or death. But driven by conscience, some Quakers repeatedly returned to Massachusetts to preach; four of them, including Mary Dyer, went to the gallows before a shocked King Charles ordered an end to the hanging of Quakers in 1661. Sat, 03 Dec 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=347 On this day in 1658, Plymouth Court ordered that any boat carrying Quakers to Sandwich be seized to prevent the religious heretics from landing. A year earlier, Quakers in Sandwich had established the first Friends' Meeting in the New World. Magistrates in both Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay colonies were alarmed by Quaker teachings that individuals could receive direct personal revelations from God. To protect orthodox Puritanism, the courts passed a series of laws forbidding residents from housing Quakers. Quakers themselves were threatened with whipping, arrest, imprisonment, banishment, or death. But driven by conscience, some Quakers repeatedly returned to Massachusetts to preach; four of them, including Mary Dyer, went to the gallows before a shocked King Charles ordered an end to the hanging of Quakers in 1661. no 0:01:00 Quakers Outlawed in Plymouth: December 3, 1658