Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Mon, 24 Nov 2014 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Elizabeth Porter Phelps Born: November 24, 1747 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=338 On this day in 1747, Elizabeth Porter was born in the Connecticut River Valley village of Hadley. Five years later, her father built the first house outside the town center. He called it "Forty Acres." It would be Elizabeth's home for the rest of her long life. Her father died in 1755. Her 36-year-old mother never remarried. With help from kinfolk, slaves, and hired help, the widow Porter ran a 600-acre farm on what was then the Massachusetts frontier. After her daughter married Charles Phelps in 1770, the younger woman became mistress of the estate. Elizabeth Porter Phelps's descendants would occupy it for the next 200 years, but she would be one of the last female members of the family to shoulder the burdens of a hard-working farm wife. Mon, 24 Nov 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=338 On this day in 1747, Elizabeth Porter was born in the Connecticut River Valley village of Hadley. Five years later, her father built the first house outside the town center. He called it "Forty Acres." It would be Elizabeth's home for the rest of her long life. Her father died in 1755. Her 36-year-old mother never remarried. With help from kinfolk, slaves, and hired help, the widow Porter ran a 600-acre farm on what was then the Massachusetts frontier. After her daughter married Charles Phelps in 1770, the younger woman became mistress of the estate. Elizabeth Porter Phelps's descendants would occupy it for the next 200 years, but she would be one of the last female members of the family to shoulder the burdens of a hard-working farm wife. no 0:01:00 Elizabeth Porter Phelps Born: November 24, 1747 Doug Flutie Throws "Hail Mary" Pass: November 23, 1984 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=337 On this day in 1984, Doug Flutie threw a last-second "Hail Mary" touchdown pass to Gerard Phelan in the end zone, giving Boston College a 47-45 win over the University of Miami. Considered too short and without a strong enough arm to play quarterback, the 5'10" Natick resident became one of the gutsiest players in football. Running away from defenders, buying time for receivers, he threw a Boston College single-year record of 3,454 yards and 27 touchdowns. Passing for over 57,000 yards in his pro career, he won three Grey Cups in the Canadian Football League and led the Buffalo Bills to the playoffs in 1998. As legendary coach John Madden said, "Inch for inch, Flutie in his prime was the best quarterback of his generation." Sun, 23 Nov 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=337 On this day in 1984, Doug Flutie threw a last-second "Hail Mary" touchdown pass to Gerard Phelan in the end zone, giving Boston College a 47-45 win over the University of Miami. Considered too short and without a strong enough arm to play quarterback, the 5'10" Natick resident became one of the gutsiest players in football. Running away from defenders, buying time for receivers, he threw a Boston College single-year record of 3,454 yards and 27 touchdowns. Passing for over 57,000 yards in his pro career, he won three Grey Cups in the Canadian Football League and led the Buffalo Bills to the playoffs in 1998. As legendary coach John Madden said, "Inch for inch, Flutie in his prime was the best quarterback of his generation." no 0:01:00 Doug Flutie Throws "Hail Mary" Pass: November 23, 1984 Eric Carle Museum Opens in Amherst: November 22, 2002 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=336 On this day in 2002, the nation's first museum of picture book art opened in Amherst. A decade earlier, children's book author and illustrator Eric Carle had visited a picture book museum in Tokyo and returned home determined to build one in the United States. The Northampton-based artist, perhaps best known for The Very Hungry Caterpillar, received support from nearby Hampshire College, which offered space on its campus. Architects designed the building to make visitors feel as if they were stepping inside one of the bold, brightly colored collages that make Eric Carle's books so engaging to children and adults alike. One of many messages Carle received at the museum's dedication read: "Everyone in our neighborhood sends congratulations." It was signed, "Your Life-Long Neighbor, Fred Rogers." Sat, 22 Nov 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=336 On this day in 2002, the nation's first museum of picture book art opened in Amherst. A decade earlier, children's book author and illustrator Eric Carle had visited a picture book museum in Tokyo and returned home determined to build one in the United States. The Northampton-based artist, perhaps best known for The Very Hungry Caterpillar, received support from nearby Hampshire College, which offered space on its campus. Architects designed the building to make visitors feel as if they were stepping inside one of the bold, brightly colored collages that make Eric Carle's books so engaging to children and adults alike. One of many messages Carle received at the museum's dedication read: "Everyone in our neighborhood sends congratulations." It was signed, "Your Life-Long Neighbor, Fred Rogers." no 0:01:00 Eric Carle Museum Opens in Amherst: November 22, 2002 "Richest Woman in America" Born in New Bedford: November 21, 1834 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=335 On this day in 1834, the wealthiest whaling family in New Bedford celebrated the birth of their only daughter. This little girl would grow up to be the richest -- and, according to legend, the most miserly -- woman in America. Through shrewd investing, Hetty Robinson Green parlayed a $100,000 inheritance into one of the largest fortunes in the United States. Stories of her eccentricities abound. She lived in low-rent tenements in New Jersey and moved frequently to avoid property taxes. She ate 15-cent lunches and always used public transport. By the time she died in 1916, Hetty Green had a net worth of $100,000,000 -- more than 2.5 billion in today's dollars. She accomplished this at a time when American women could not yet vote. Fri, 21 Nov 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=335 On this day in 1834, the wealthiest whaling family in New Bedford celebrated the birth of their only daughter. This little girl would grow up to be the richest -- and, according to legend, the most miserly -- woman in America. Through shrewd investing, Hetty Robinson Green parlayed a $100,000 inheritance into one of the largest fortunes in the United States. Stories of her eccentricities abound. She lived in low-rent tenements in New Jersey and moved frequently to avoid property taxes. She ate 15-cent lunches and always used public transport. By the time she died in 1916, Hetty Green had a net worth of $100,000,000 -- more than 2.5 billion in today's dollars. She accomplished this at a time when American women could not yet vote. no 0:01:00 "Richest Woman in America" Born in New Bedford: November 21, 1834 Whaleship Essex Sinks: November 20, 1820 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=334 On this day in 1820, an enormous sperm whale rammed and sank the Nantucket whaleship Essex in the heart of the Pacific Ocean. The first mate described the 85-foot whale's unprovoked attack as enraged and vengeful. The 20-man crew of the Essex rigged improvised sails on three whale boats and attempted to sail over 3,000 miles in the open ocean to reach land. During their excruciating voyage, storms, sun, hunger, and scorching thirst made life nearly unbearable. The men began to die, and eventually the living chose to survive by eating the dead. After four months, five survivors were finally picked up off the coast of Chile. The story of the Essex served as the inspiration for Herman Melville's great American novel, Moby-Dick. Thu, 20 Nov 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=334 On this day in 1820, an enormous sperm whale rammed and sank the Nantucket whaleship Essex in the heart of the Pacific Ocean. The first mate described the 85-foot whale's unprovoked attack as enraged and vengeful. The 20-man crew of the Essex rigged improvised sails on three whale boats and attempted to sail over 3,000 miles in the open ocean to reach land. During their excruciating voyage, storms, sun, hunger, and scorching thirst made life nearly unbearable. The men began to die, and eventually the living chose to survive by eating the dead. After four months, five survivors were finally picked up off the coast of Chile. The story of the Essex served as the inspiration for Herman Melville's great American novel, Moby-Dick. no 0:01:00 Whaleship Essex Sinks: November 20, 1820 Edward Everett Gives Gettysburg Address: November 19, 1863 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=333 On this day in 1863, Edward Everett spoke at the dedication of Gettysburg's National Cemetery, giving what is remembered today as the other Gettysburg Address. The Boston orator was the obvious choice for the occasion. During his 40-year career as professor, diplomat, and statesman, he had consistently dazzled audiences with his brilliant oratory. At Gettysburg, Everett held the crowd spellbound for two hours. But his words are not the ones that are remembered from that day. When Abraham Lincoln followed Everett to the podium, the president spoke for only three minutes, but what he said entered the national memory and has remained there ever since. Everett's Gettysburg address lives on, in the words of one historian, "as a foil to that better thing that followed." Wed, 19 Nov 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=333 On this day in 1863, Edward Everett spoke at the dedication of Gettysburg's National Cemetery, giving what is remembered today as the other Gettysburg Address. The Boston orator was the obvious choice for the occasion. During his 40-year career as professor, diplomat, and statesman, he had consistently dazzled audiences with his brilliant oratory. At Gettysburg, Everett held the crowd spellbound for two hours. But his words are not the ones that are remembered from that day. When Abraham Lincoln followed Everett to the podium, the president spoke for only three minutes, but what he said entered the national memory and has remained there ever since. Everett's Gettysburg address lives on, in the words of one historian, "as a foil to that better thing that followed." no 0:01:00 Edward Everett Gives Gettysburg Address: November 19, 1863 First Lepers Arrive on Penikese Island: November 18, 1905 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=332 On this day in 1905, five lepers arrived on Penikese Island in Buzzard's Bay, the site of the first and only leprosarium in Massachusetts. Over the next 16 years, 36 victims of leprosy, or Hansen's disease, lived on the isolated island, along with a handful of caregivers. Dr. Frank Parker and his wife, Marion, went to great lengths to make the patients comfortable, providing good food, fresh air, exercise, entertainment, and nursing, but it was nearly impossible to overcome the stigma and social ostracism associated with leprosy. Still, the island produced stories of great courage, kindness, and fortitude. The colony closed when the federal government opened a leprosy hospital in Louisiana. Today, the island is home to a private school for troubled youth. Tue, 18 Nov 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=332 On this day in 1905, five lepers arrived on Penikese Island in Buzzard's Bay, the site of the first and only leprosarium in Massachusetts. Over the next 16 years, 36 victims of leprosy, or Hansen's disease, lived on the isolated island, along with a handful of caregivers. Dr. Frank Parker and his wife, Marion, went to great lengths to make the patients comfortable, providing good food, fresh air, exercise, entertainment, and nursing, but it was nearly impossible to overcome the stigma and social ostracism associated with leprosy. Still, the island produced stories of great courage, kindness, and fortitude. The colony closed when the federal government opened a leprosy hospital in Louisiana. Today, the island is home to a private school for troubled youth. no 0:01:00 First Lepers Arrive on Penikese Island: November 18, 1905