Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Tue, 22 Jul 2014 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities First Train Reaches Provincetown: July 22, 1873 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=213 On this day in 1873, the first train arrived at the tip of Cape Cod. The streets were bedecked with flags and streamers as 13 bright yellow coach cars, filled to capacity, pulled into Provincetown. The Cape's traditional economy was in decline. Residents were counting on the railroad to bring better times. Summer visitors from Boston could now spend five hours on a comfortable train, instead of risking a choppy ride by steamer or enduring a two-day stagecoach trip. And they could stay in the large hotels that were built in towns all over the Cape. The heyday of the Cape as a railroad resort came to an end when cars became the preferred mode of transportation. In 1959 regular passenger service to Cape Cod ended. Tue, 22 Jul 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=213 On this day in 1873, the first train arrived at the tip of Cape Cod. The streets were bedecked with flags and streamers as 13 bright yellow coach cars, filled to capacity, pulled into Provincetown. The Cape's traditional economy was in decline. Residents were counting on the railroad to bring better times. Summer visitors from Boston could now spend five hours on a comfortable train, instead of risking a choppy ride by steamer or enduring a two-day stagecoach trip. And they could stay in the large hotels that were built in towns all over the Cape. The heyday of the Cape as a railroad resort came to an end when cars became the preferred mode of transportation. In 1959 regular passenger service to Cape Cod ended. no 0:01:00 First Train Reaches Provincetown: July 22, 1873 German U-Boat Attacks Cape Cod: July 21, 1918 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=212 On this day in 1918, people in the Cape Cod town of Orleans were astonished to see a German U-boat surface offshore and begin firing on an unarmed tugboat and the four barges it was pulling. Torpedoes set the tug ablaze and injured its crew, while constant shelling sank the barges. Thanks to the skill and courage of Coast Guardsmen, everyone was rescued. Some of the shells fired from the sub landed on the beach, making this the first time the U.S. mainland had been attacked since the War of 1812 and the only time the country was attacked during World War I. The state had been producing arms, vehicles, and supplies for the war effort and sending soldiers abroad, but no one expected what occurred that Sunday in Orleans. Mon, 21 Jul 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=212 On this day in 1918, people in the Cape Cod town of Orleans were astonished to see a German U-boat surface offshore and begin firing on an unarmed tugboat and the four barges it was pulling. Torpedoes set the tug ablaze and injured its crew, while constant shelling sank the barges. Thanks to the skill and courage of Coast Guardsmen, everyone was rescued. Some of the shells fired from the sub landed on the beach, making this the first time the U.S. mainland had been attacked since the War of 1812 and the only time the country was attacked during World War I. The state had been producing arms, vehicles, and supplies for the war effort and sending soldiers abroad, but no one expected what occurred that Sunday in Orleans. no 0:01:00 German U-Boat Attacks Cape Cod: July 21, 1918 Berkshire Town Sends Giant Cheese Ball to Washington: July 20, 1801 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=211 On this day in 1801, the Berkshire County town of Cheshire made a 1235-pound ball of cheese and shipped it to Washington, D.C. as a gift for the newly-elected President, Thomas Jefferson, who was a popular figure in western Massachusetts. When news of the "mammoth cheese" reached the eastern part of the state, it caused consternation. Jefferson had won the presidency by defeating John Adams, Massachusetts' native son. Westerners were more in sympathy with Jefferson's vision of a nation of independent yeoman farmers than they were with the strong central government advocated by Adams and his supporters in the Federalist Party. Cheshire's cheese was a sign of the tensions over ideology, economics, and politics that long divided the state's eastern and western regions. Sun, 20 Jul 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=211 On this day in 1801, the Berkshire County town of Cheshire made a 1235-pound ball of cheese and shipped it to Washington, D.C. as a gift for the newly-elected President, Thomas Jefferson, who was a popular figure in western Massachusetts. When news of the "mammoth cheese" reached the eastern part of the state, it caused consternation. Jefferson had won the presidency by defeating John Adams, Massachusetts' native son. Westerners were more in sympathy with Jefferson's vision of a nation of independent yeoman farmers than they were with the strong central government advocated by Adams and his supporters in the Federalist Party. Cheshire's cheese was a sign of the tensions over ideology, economics, and politics that long divided the state's eastern and western regions. no 0:01:00 Berkshire Town Sends Giant Cheese Ball to Washington: July 20, 1801 Percy Spencer, Inventor of Microwave Oven, Born: July 19, 1894 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=210 On this day in 1894, Percy Spencer, the self-taught scientist who discovered the power of microwave technology, was born. With an endlessly curious mind, Spencer spent much of his early life figuring out how things worked. Orphaned as a small boy, Spencer had little schooling before he entered the workforce. But a fascination with electricity and nights of studying on his own led to a job with a new firm in Cambridge -- Raytheon. During World War II, Spencer and his co-workers developed technology that gave the Allies a critical edge in radar detection. Later, a set of simple experiments based on everyday experiences resulted in the first microwave oven, the 750-pound, five-foot-tall RadarRange. Sat, 19 Jul 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=210 On this day in 1894, Percy Spencer, the self-taught scientist who discovered the power of microwave technology, was born. With an endlessly curious mind, Spencer spent much of his early life figuring out how things worked. Orphaned as a small boy, Spencer had little schooling before he entered the workforce. But a fascination with electricity and nights of studying on his own led to a job with a new firm in Cambridge -- Raytheon. During World War II, Spencer and his co-workers developed technology that gave the Allies a critical edge in radar detection. Later, a set of simple experiments based on everyday experiences resulted in the first microwave oven, the 750-pound, five-foot-tall RadarRange. no 0:01:00 Percy Spencer, Inventor of Microwave Oven, Born: July 19, 1894 Hemingway Room Dedicated at JFK Library: July 18, 1980 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=209 On this day in 1980, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and Ernest Hemingway's son Patrick dedicated the Hemingway Room at the recently opened John F. Kennedy Library and Museum in Boston. The Nobel-prize winning author and the 35th president never met, but they admired each other greatly. After their deaths, their widows agreed that the presidential library would be a fitting repository for Hemingway's collection. A special room was created to house not only his personal papers, memorabilia, photographs, and scrapbooks, but carved African statues and hunting trophies as well. The rest of the building is devoted to the memory of the slain president and "to all those who through the art of politics seek a new and better world." Fri, 18 Jul 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=209 On this day in 1980, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and Ernest Hemingway's son Patrick dedicated the Hemingway Room at the recently opened John F. Kennedy Library and Museum in Boston. The Nobel-prize winning author and the 35th president never met, but they admired each other greatly. After their deaths, their widows agreed that the presidential library would be a fitting repository for Hemingway's collection. A special room was created to house not only his personal papers, memorabilia, photographs, and scrapbooks, but carved African statues and hunting trophies as well. The rest of the building is devoted to the memory of the slain president and "to all those who through the art of politics seek a new and better world." no 0:01:00 Hemingway Room Dedicated at JFK Library: July 18, 1980 Yiddish Book Rescuer Wins Genius Grant: July 17, 1989 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=208 On this day in 1989, an Amherst man who had spent more than a decade scrounging in dumpsters, basements, and attics was awarded a MacArthur Foundation "genius grant." Aaron Lansky led an initially quixotic campaign to save Yiddish books and, in the process, Yiddish culture. As Jews from eastern and central Europe assimilated to new homelands, they abandoned the language and the literature of their parents and grandparents. Lansky traveled across the U.S. and around the world rescuing Yiddish books. With his MacArthur money, he opened the National Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, which houses the world's largest collection of Yiddish literature and is now "one of the most visited and talked about Jewish tourist destinations in the world." Thu, 17 Jul 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=208 On this day in 1989, an Amherst man who had spent more than a decade scrounging in dumpsters, basements, and attics was awarded a MacArthur Foundation "genius grant." Aaron Lansky led an initially quixotic campaign to save Yiddish books and, in the process, Yiddish culture. As Jews from eastern and central Europe assimilated to new homelands, they abandoned the language and the literature of their parents and grandparents. Lansky traveled across the U.S. and around the world rescuing Yiddish books. With his MacArthur money, he opened the National Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, which houses the world's largest collection of Yiddish literature and is now "one of the most visited and talked about Jewish tourist destinations in the world." no 0:01:00 Yiddish Book Rescuer Wins Genius Grant: July 17, 1989 Borden Announces Plan to Sell Prince Pasta Plant: July 16, 1997 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=207 On this day in 1997, the Borden company announced a tentative deal to save the Prince pasta factory in Lowell. When Borden closed the failing plant, Senator Ted Kennedy remarked that it was "a sad day in Spaghettiville." Prince had been one of Lowell's major employers ever since it moved there from the North End in 1912. To TV viewers, however, the company was forever associated with Boston's "Little Italy." Commercials showed a boy running home through the narrow North End streets, with the tag line "Wednesday is Prince Spaghetti Day." Employees and investors tried to buy the pasta plant. Borden was willing to sell the building but not the Prince name. The deal fell through, and Lowell was Spaghettiville no more. Wed, 16 Jul 2014 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=207 On this day in 1997, the Borden company announced a tentative deal to save the Prince pasta factory in Lowell. When Borden closed the failing plant, Senator Ted Kennedy remarked that it was "a sad day in Spaghettiville." Prince had been one of Lowell's major employers ever since it moved there from the North End in 1912. To TV viewers, however, the company was forever associated with Boston's "Little Italy." Commercials showed a boy running home through the narrow North End streets, with the tag line "Wednesday is Prince Spaghetti Day." Employees and investors tried to buy the pasta plant. Borden was willing to sell the building but not the Prince name. The deal fell through, and Lowell was Spaghettiville no more. no 0:01:00 Borden Announces Plan to Sell Prince Pasta Plant: July 16, 1997