Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Tue, 23 Aug 2016 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Route 128 Opens Boston's High Tech Age: August 24, 1951 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=246 On this day in 1951, the first segment of Route 128 was opened. By 1956, the expressway stretched 65 miles from Gloucester to Braintree. While officials were confident the road would relieve traffic in Boston and help ease travel between the region's growing suburbs, they did not foresee that Route 128 would become a destination -- and an economic engine -- in its own right. But it did. Real estate developers came up with their own innovation -- the first modern industrial parks -- that were ideal locations for the growing number of technology companies in the state. The proximity to university labs and to expanding suburban communities drew so many high tech companies to the area that Route 128 was dubbed "America's Technology Highway." Wed, 24 Aug 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=246 On this day in 1951, the first segment of Route 128 was opened. By 1956, the expressway stretched 65 miles from Gloucester to Braintree. While officials were confident the road would relieve traffic in Boston and help ease travel between the region's growing suburbs, they did not foresee that Route 128 would become a destination -- and an economic engine -- in its own right. But it did. Real estate developers came up with their own innovation -- the first modern industrial parks -- that were ideal locations for the growing number of technology companies in the state. The proximity to university labs and to expanding suburban communities drew so many high tech companies to the area that Route 128 was dubbed "America's Technology Highway." no 0:01:00 Route 128 Opens Boston's High Tech Age: August 24, 1951 Massachusetts Executes Sacco and Vanzetti: August 23, 1927 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=245 On this day in 1927, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were put to death in the state prison in Charlestown. A jury convicted them of murder and robbery in 1921, but a long struggle was waged to save their lives. The trial occurred during a period of intense prejudice against immigrants and radicals. Sacco and Vanzetti were both. Many people who followed the case believed that the pair were tried for their ethnicity and their politics, not because the evidence supported the charge. Numerous appeals were filed, another man confessed, the case became an international cause celebre -- all to no avail. With a large and angry crowd gathered outside, at midnight the lights in the prison flickered. Sacco and Vanzetti died in the electric chair. Tue, 23 Aug 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=245 On this day in 1927, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were put to death in the state prison in Charlestown. A jury convicted them of murder and robbery in 1921, but a long struggle was waged to save their lives. The trial occurred during a period of intense prejudice against immigrants and radicals. Sacco and Vanzetti were both. Many people who followed the case believed that the pair were tried for their ethnicity and their politics, not because the evidence supported the charge. Numerous appeals were filed, another man confessed, the case became an international cause celebre -- all to no avail. With a large and angry crowd gathered outside, at midnight the lights in the prison flickered. Sacco and Vanzetti died in the electric chair. no 0:01:00 Massachusetts Executes Sacco and Vanzetti: August 23, 1927 Jury Decides in Favor of Elizabeth "Mum Bett" Freeman: August 22, 1781 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=244 On this day in 1781, a jury in Great Barrington found in favor of "Mum Bett," a black woman who had been a slave in the home of Colonel John Ashley for at least 30 years. Listening to her master's friends discuss the newly ratified Massachusetts Constitution, she concluded that if all people were born free and equal, so was she. She found a young lawyer to represent her, and he persuaded a Berkshire County jury to declare her free. Two years later, in a case involving Quok Walker, a slave in Worcester County, the Chief Justice of the state's highest court declared that "slavery is inconsistent with our own conduct and Constitution." Massachusetts had been the first colony to legalize slavery; now it was the first state to abolish it. Mon, 22 Aug 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=244 On this day in 1781, a jury in Great Barrington found in favor of "Mum Bett," a black woman who had been a slave in the home of Colonel John Ashley for at least 30 years. Listening to her master's friends discuss the newly ratified Massachusetts Constitution, she concluded that if all people were born free and equal, so was she. She found a young lawyer to represent her, and he persuaded a Berkshire County jury to declare her free. Two years later, in a case involving Quok Walker, a slave in Worcester County, the Chief Justice of the state's highest court declared that "slavery is inconsistent with our own conduct and Constitution." Massachusetts had been the first colony to legalize slavery; now it was the first state to abolish it. no 0:01:00 Jury Decides in Favor of Elizabeth "Mum Bett" Freeman: August 22, 1781 Pilgrim Monument Completed in Provincetown: August 21, 1909 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=242 On this day in 1909, two young girls, using ropes and a pulley, helped haul the last stone into place to complete the Pilgrim Monument in Provincetown. The town's Yankee residents had long been seeking funds to erect a monument to the Pilgrims, who landed on the tip of Cape Cod weeks before they ever laid eyes on Plymouth. It took until 1906 to raise enough money. The following year, President Theodore Roosevelt sailed to Provincetown in a yacht appropriately named the Mayflower to lay the cornerstone of the monument. Three years later, President William Howard Taft spoke at the dedication. 116 steps and 60 ramps lead to the top of the 252-foot tower, which is still the tallest all-granite structure in the United States. Sun, 21 Aug 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=242 On this day in 1909, two young girls, using ropes and a pulley, helped haul the last stone into place to complete the Pilgrim Monument in Provincetown. The town's Yankee residents had long been seeking funds to erect a monument to the Pilgrims, who landed on the tip of Cape Cod weeks before they ever laid eyes on Plymouth. It took until 1906 to raise enough money. The following year, President Theodore Roosevelt sailed to Provincetown in a yacht appropriately named the Mayflower to lay the cornerstone of the monument. Three years later, President William Howard Taft spoke at the dedication. 116 steps and 60 ramps lead to the top of the 252-foot tower, which is still the tallest all-granite structure in the United States. no 0:01:00 Pilgrim Monument Completed in Provincetown: August 21, 1909 Dr. Susan Dimock Begins Medical Residency: August 20, 1872 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=243 On this day in 1872, Dr. Susan Dimock became the resident physician at the New England Hospital for Women and Children in Boston. Only a month earlier, she had returned from medical school in Europe, where there was less hostility to women becoming doctors. In her three years at the New England Hospital, she handled day-to-day management, cared for patients, and performed surgery. Her most lasting contribution, however, was her work to improve the training of nurses. In Dimock's program, students not only worked on the wards, they also attended lectures and studied anatomy. Tragedy struck before Susan Dimock could see how much the professionalization of nursing did to transform American health care. She died in a shipwreck at the age of 28. Sat, 20 Aug 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=243 On this day in 1872, Dr. Susan Dimock became the resident physician at the New England Hospital for Women and Children in Boston. Only a month earlier, she had returned from medical school in Europe, where there was less hostility to women becoming doctors. In her three years at the New England Hospital, she handled day-to-day management, cared for patients, and performed surgery. Her most lasting contribution, however, was her work to improve the training of nurses. In Dimock's program, students not only worked on the wards, they also attended lectures and studied anatomy. Tragedy struck before Susan Dimock could see how much the professionalization of nursing did to transform American health care. She died in a shipwreck at the age of 28. no 0:01:00 Dr. Susan Dimock Begins Medical Residency: August 20, 1872 Smithsonian Puts Julia Child's Kitchen on Display: August 19, 2002 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=241 On this day in 2002, a new exhibit opened in Washington, DC. The kitchen in Julia Child's Cambridge home of 32 years had been disassembled and moved to the Smithsonian. Designed by her husband Paul in 1961, the room was specially tailored to his wife's particular needs, with high countertops to accommodate her six-foot two-inch frame. In her ten cookbooks and eight television programs, several of which were filmed in her own kitchen, Julia Child demystified French cooking for American audiences. She became, in the words of the New York Times, "the French chef for a Jello nation." The exhibit is titled "Bon Appétit!" -- as she signed off at the end of every show she hosted during her 38 years as a television icon. Fri, 19 Aug 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=241 On this day in 2002, a new exhibit opened in Washington, DC. The kitchen in Julia Child's Cambridge home of 32 years had been disassembled and moved to the Smithsonian. Designed by her husband Paul in 1961, the room was specially tailored to his wife's particular needs, with high countertops to accommodate her six-foot two-inch frame. In her ten cookbooks and eight television programs, several of which were filmed in her own kitchen, Julia Child demystified French cooking for American audiences. She became, in the words of the New York Times, "the French chef for a Jello nation." The exhibit is titled "Bon Appétit!" -- as she signed off at the end of every show she hosted during her 38 years as a television icon. no 0:01:00 Smithsonian Puts Julia Child's Kitchen on Display: August 19, 2002 Fans Celebrate John L. Sullivan: August 18, 1887 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=240 On this day in 1887, thousands of adoring hometown fans flocked to Nantasket Beach in Hull to glimpse Boston-born John L. Sullivan, the Heavyweight Champion of the World, and the diamond-studded, gold-plated belt he was given on the eve of his world tour. Sullivan had escaped the poverty of his Irish immigrant family by fighting for money, despite the fact that it was illegal in most states. A remarkable record of 47 wins, one loss, and three draws brought Sullivan international fame and close to $1,000,000 in prize money. Alcoholism interrupted and finally ended his boxing career. Considered the first American sports idol, John L. Sullivan was known during his time as "the man most men wanted to be." Thu, 18 Aug 2016 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=240 On this day in 1887, thousands of adoring hometown fans flocked to Nantasket Beach in Hull to glimpse Boston-born John L. Sullivan, the Heavyweight Champion of the World, and the diamond-studded, gold-plated belt he was given on the eve of his world tour. Sullivan had escaped the poverty of his Irish immigrant family by fighting for money, despite the fact that it was illegal in most states. A remarkable record of 47 wins, one loss, and three draws brought Sullivan international fame and close to $1,000,000 in prize money. Alcoholism interrupted and finally ended his boxing career. Considered the first American sports idol, John L. Sullivan was known during his time as "the man most men wanted to be." no 0:01:00 Fans Celebrate John L. Sullivan: August 18, 1887