Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ A daily almanac of Massachusetts history 1440 Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities TheOtherRoom.com CFML RSS Generator Tue, 07 Jul 2015 04:00:00 EST en-us Visitors of Mass Moments--a daily almanac of Massachusetts history--can learn more about the Moments presented on the radio, see images and illustrations, read a primary source document, and get suggestions of links to follow and places to visit. Additionally, they can view a timeline to see when a given Moment occurred, and where applicable, a map to see where it happened. Visitors are invited to comment or ask questions about a Moment on our message board, thus providing an on-line community where Bay State history enthusiasts can meet and discuss our past. They can sign up to receive Mass Moments daily in their email, and if they post a question to the message board, they can be notified when someone has responded. Past Moments (those posted since January 1, 2005) are searchable, by key words, subject, time period, and region. A daily almanac of Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Massachusetts almanac, radio program, eMoment, eMoments, Massachusetts history, Bay State, Western Mass, MA, Eastern Mass, Boston, Mass Moments, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, daily history, this day in history, today's history, today in history http://www.massmoments.org/rss/images/mass_moments_75.jpg Mass Moments http://www.massmoments.org/ info@massmoments.org Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities Rockport Women Smash Liquor Barrels: July 8, 1856 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=199 On this day in 1856, 200 women, some of them wielding hatchets and ranging in age from 37 to 75, rampaged through the town of Rockport destroying every container of alcohol they could find. One eyewitness recorded in his journal: "There has been exciting times a-going on here today." Weeks of planning preceded the five-hour raid. When it was over, the women had spilled hundreds of gallons of liquor. Over the next decade, alcohol sales in the town steadily declined. Rockport became one of several dozen Massachusetts towns where one could not buy liquor. Not until April 2005 would residents vote to permit inns, hotels, and restaurants to serve alcohol with meals. Twelve towns in the Commonwealth are still dry today, down from 17 in 2004. Wed, 08 Jul 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=199 On this day in 1856, 200 women, some of them wielding hatchets and ranging in age from 37 to 75, rampaged through the town of Rockport destroying every container of alcohol they could find. One eyewitness recorded in his journal: "There has been exciting times a-going on here today." Weeks of planning preceded the five-hour raid. When it was over, the women had spilled hundreds of gallons of liquor. Over the next decade, alcohol sales in the town steadily declined. Rockport became one of several dozen Massachusetts towns where one could not buy liquor. Not until April 2005 would residents vote to permit inns, hotels, and restaurants to serve alcohol with meals. Twelve towns in the Commonwealth are still dry today, down from 17 in 2004. no 0:01:00 Rockport Women Smash Liquor Barrels: July 8, 1856 Dr. Harriot K. Hunt Visits the Shakers: July 7, 1848 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=198 On this day in 1848, Dr. Harriot K. Hunt of Boston, one of the nation's first female physicians, made a visit to the Shaker community in Harvard. She found much to her liking. There were male and female healers, and they were highly skilled in the homeopathic medicine she herself practiced. They used herbal remedies, water cures, careful hygiene, and exercise with such success that Shakers were famed for their longevity. Equally unusual, Shaker communities accorded women a status equal to men -- something that Harriot Hunt had struggled hard to achieve in her own life. Refused admission to Harvard Medical School, Hunt became an advocate for women's rights -- their right to vote, to enter the professions, and especially their right to attend established medical colleges. Tue, 07 Jul 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=198 On this day in 1848, Dr. Harriot K. Hunt of Boston, one of the nation's first female physicians, made a visit to the Shaker community in Harvard. She found much to her liking. There were male and female healers, and they were highly skilled in the homeopathic medicine she herself practiced. They used herbal remedies, water cures, careful hygiene, and exercise with such success that Shakers were famed for their longevity. Equally unusual, Shaker communities accorded women a status equal to men -- something that Harriot Hunt had struggled hard to achieve in her own life. Refused admission to Harvard Medical School, Hunt became an advocate for women's rights -- their right to vote, to enter the professions, and especially their right to attend established medical colleges. no 0:01:00 Dr. Harriot K. Hunt Visits the Shakers: July 7, 1848 Weepin' Willie Robinson Born: July 6, 1926 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=197 On this day in 1926, "Boston's Elder Statesman of the Blues," Weepin' Willie Robinson, was born. Raised in the South, he launched his musical career in Trenton, New Jersey, before coming to Boston in the late 1950s. Although Boston had a much smaller black population than Chicago or Detroit, "all the players came through here." Roxbury, Willie later remembered, was "where it was happening in those days. It was hot." Famous bluesmen played here, and Weepin' Willie sang with them all. In the 1960s Boston was a mecca for the blues, as college students and young folk and rock musicians swelled the audience at the city's clubs. In 2000 the Blues Trust Foundation presented Weepin' Willie Robinson with a Lifetime Achievement Award. Mon, 06 Jul 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=197 On this day in 1926, "Boston's Elder Statesman of the Blues," Weepin' Willie Robinson, was born. Raised in the South, he launched his musical career in Trenton, New Jersey, before coming to Boston in the late 1950s. Although Boston had a much smaller black population than Chicago or Detroit, "all the players came through here." Roxbury, Willie later remembered, was "where it was happening in those days. It was hot." Famous bluesmen played here, and Weepin' Willie sang with them all. In the 1960s Boston was a mecca for the blues, as college students and young folk and rock musicians swelled the audience at the city's clubs. In 2000 the Blues Trust Foundation presented Weepin' Willie Robinson with a Lifetime Achievement Award. no 0:01:00 Weepin' Willie Robinson Born: July 6, 1926 Strike Ends in Hopedale: July 5, 1913 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=196 On this day in 1913, a 13-week strike at the Draper Corporation in Hopedale ended in failure, and the workers returned to their jobs. This was a time of labor unrest throughout the country, but the Draper family was shocked that their workers would strike. The corporation provided them with decent housing, modern utilities, even recreational facilities. Ebenezer Draper originally came to Hopedale in the 1840s. He was a major investor in and a resident of the utopian community that thrived there for over a decade. When the community failed in 1856, Ebenezer and his brother converted it into a successful manufacturing venture. The Drapers continued the tradition of social reform by making Hopedale a model company town. Today it is part of the Blackstone National Heritage Corridor. Sun, 05 Jul 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=196 On this day in 1913, a 13-week strike at the Draper Corporation in Hopedale ended in failure, and the workers returned to their jobs. This was a time of labor unrest throughout the country, but the Draper family was shocked that their workers would strike. The corporation provided them with decent housing, modern utilities, even recreational facilities. Ebenezer Draper originally came to Hopedale in the 1840s. He was a major investor in and a resident of the utopian community that thrived there for over a decade. When the community failed in 1856, Ebenezer and his brother converted it into a successful manufacturing venture. The Drapers continued the tradition of social reform by making Hopedale a model company town. Today it is part of the Blackstone National Heritage Corridor. no 0:01:00 Strike Ends in Hopedale: July 5, 1913 John Adams Dies: July 4, 1826 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=195 On this day in 1826, 50 years after the Declaration of Independence was adopted in Philadelphia, John Adams died at home in Braintree. One of the great men of the Revolutionary generation and the second president of the United States, Adams was 91 years old. Shortly before he breathed his last, John Adams whispered, "Thomas Jefferson survives." In fact, 560 miles away at Monticello, Thomas Jefferson had died only a few hours earlier. The fact that these two founding fathers died on the same day and that it was, of all days, the Fourth of July was not viewed as a coincidence. In his two-hour eulogy at Fanueil Hall, Daniel Webster cited it as "proof" of how much God cared for the country. Sat, 04 Jul 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=195 On this day in 1826, 50 years after the Declaration of Independence was adopted in Philadelphia, John Adams died at home in Braintree. One of the great men of the Revolutionary generation and the second president of the United States, Adams was 91 years old. Shortly before he breathed his last, John Adams whispered, "Thomas Jefferson survives." In fact, 560 miles away at Monticello, Thomas Jefferson had died only a few hours earlier. The fact that these two founding fathers died on the same day and that it was, of all days, the Fourth of July was not viewed as a coincidence. In his two-hour eulogy at Fanueil Hall, Daniel Webster cited it as "proof" of how much God cared for the country. no 0:01:00 John Adams Dies: July 4, 1826 Painter John Singleton Copley Born: July 3, 1738 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=194 On this day in 1738, John Singleton Copley was born in Boston to recent Irish immigrants. From these humble beginnings, he became the foremost artist in colonial America. His natural talent, attention to detail, and determination made up for his lack of formal artistic training. A key ingredient in his success was his ability to paint his subjects in poses and settings borrowed from the English aristocracy they so admired. Although he and his family lived in an elegant mansion on Beacon Hill, Copley was "mortified" that his countrymen considered an artist "little better than a carpenter or shoemaker." When the coming Revolution caused most of his wealthy clients to leave Boston, he left, too. He never returned to his native land. Fri, 03 Jul 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=194 On this day in 1738, John Singleton Copley was born in Boston to recent Irish immigrants. From these humble beginnings, he became the foremost artist in colonial America. His natural talent, attention to detail, and determination made up for his lack of formal artistic training. A key ingredient in his success was his ability to paint his subjects in poses and settings borrowed from the English aristocracy they so admired. Although he and his family lived in an elegant mansion on Beacon Hill, Copley was "mortified" that his countrymen considered an artist "little better than a carpenter or shoemaker." When the coming Revolution caused most of his wealthy clients to leave Boston, he left, too. He never returned to his native land. no 0:01:00 Painter John Singleton Copley Born: July 3, 1738 Brookfield Woman Put to Death: July 2, 1778 http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=193 On this day in 1778, an intelligent and high-spirited beauty from Brookfield became the first woman to be executed in the new American republic. The 32-year-old's crime was indeed horrific: she had arranged for the cold-blooded murder of her husband by three soldiers who fell under her spell. But Bathsheba Spooner was also a victim. She was trapped by social mores that allowed no escape from an abusive husband. Condemned for her Loyalist sympathies, she was rushed to judgment by a community fearful of civil disorder. On the scaffold she declared that "she justly died; that she hoped to see her Christian friends she left behind her, in Heaven, but that none of them might go there in the ignominious manner that she did." Thu, 02 Jul 2015 04:00:00 EST http://www.massmoments.org/index.cfm?mid=193 On this day in 1778, an intelligent and high-spirited beauty from Brookfield became the first woman to be executed in the new American republic. The 32-year-old's crime was indeed horrific: she had arranged for the cold-blooded murder of her husband by three soldiers who fell under her spell. But Bathsheba Spooner was also a victim. She was trapped by social mores that allowed no escape from an abusive husband. Condemned for her Loyalist sympathies, she was rushed to judgment by a community fearful of civil disorder. On the scaffold she declared that "she justly died; that she hoped to see her Christian friends she left behind her, in Heaven, but that none of them might go there in the ignominious manner that she did." no 0:01:00 Brookfield Woman Put to Death: July 2, 1778